England

(redirected from Life in England)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Eng·land

 (ĭng′glənd)
A division of the United Kingdom, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. Inhabited in prehistoric times by Celtic peoples, it was subsequently invaded by Romans, Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Danes, and Normans. Acts of union joined England with Wales in 1536, with Scotland in 1707 to create the political entity of Great Britain, and with Ireland in 1801 to form the United Kingdom. London is the historic capital and the largest city.

England

(ˈɪŋɡlənd)
n
(Placename) the largest division of Great Britain, bordering on Scotland and Wales: unified in the mid-tenth century and conquered by the Normans in 1066; united with Wales in 1536 and Scotland in 1707; monarchy overthrown in 1649 but restored in 1660. Capital: London. Pop: 53 012 456 (2011 est). Area: 130 439 sq km (50 352 sq miles). See United Kingdom, Great Britain

Eng•land

(ˈɪŋ glənd or, often, -lənd)

n.
the largest division of the United Kingdom, constituting, with Scotland and Wales, the island of Great Britain. 55,780,000; 50,360 sq. mi. (130,439 sq. km). Cap.: London.

England


an authority on England, its language, or its literature.
an extreme devotion to English manners, customs, or institutions.
great admiration for England and things English. — Anglophile, n., adj.
a hatred or fear of England and things English. — Anglophobe, n., adj.
1. the state or condition of being English, especially by birth.
2. a population outside of England that is English or of English descent.
English History. the seven principal concurrent early English kingdoms. — heptarch, n. — heptarchic, heptarchical, heptarchal, adj.
the squires or landed gentry as a class.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.England - a division of the United KingdomEngland - a division of the United Kingdom  
Great Revolt, Peasant's Revolt - a widespread rebellion in 1381 against poll taxes and other inequities that oppressed the poorer people of England; suppressed by Richard II
Battle of Flodden Field, Flodden - a battle in 1513; the English defeated the invading Scots and James IV was killed
battle of Hastings, Hastings - the decisive battle in which William the Conqueror (duke of Normandy) defeated the Saxons under Harold II (1066) and thus left England open for the Norman Conquest
Battle of Maldon, Maldon - a battle in which the Danes defeated the Saxons in 991; celebrated in an old English poem
battle of Marston Moor, Marston Moor - a battle in 1644 in which the Parliamentarians under the earl of Manchester defeated the Royalists under Prince Rupert
Battle of Naseby, Naseby - a battle in 1645 that settled the outcome of the first English Civil War as the Parliamentarians won a major victory over the Royalists
battle of Tewkesbury, Tewkesbury - the final battle of the War of the Roses in 1471 in which Edward IV defeated the Lancastrians
English Civil War - civil war in England between the Parliamentarians and the Royalists under Charles I; 1644-1648
Restoration - the re-establishment of the British monarchy in 1660
War of the Roses, Wars of the Roses - struggle for the English throne (1455-1485) between the house of York (white rose) and the house of Lancaster (red rose) ending with the accession of the Tudor monarch Henry VII
balldress - a suit or dress for formal occasions
Puritanism - the beliefs and practices characteristic of Puritans (most of whom were Calvinists who wished to purify the Church of England of its Catholic aspects)
Cotswold Hills, Cotswolds - a range of low hills in southwestern England
Cheviot Hills, Cheviots - a range of hills on the border between England and Scotland
Pennine Chain, Pennines - a system of hills in Britain that extend from the Scottish border in the north to the Trent River in the south; forms the watershed for English rivers
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Lancaster - a city in northwestern England
Lake District, Lakeland - a popular tourist area in northwestern England including England's largest lake and highest mountain
British capital, capital of the United Kingdom, Greater London, London - the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center
Manchester - a city in northwestern England (30 miles to the east of Liverpool); heart of the most densely populated area of England
Kingston-upon Hull, Hull - a large fishing port in northeastern England
Liverpool - a large city in northwestern England; its port is the country's major outlet for industrial exports
Brummagem, Birmingham - a city in central England; 2nd largest English city and an important industrial and transportation center
Oxford - a city in southern England to the northwest of London; site of Oxford University
Cambridge - a city in eastern England on the River Cam; site of Cambridge University
Bath - a town in southwestern England on the River Avon; famous for its hot springs and Roman remains
Blackpool - a resort town in Lancashire in northwestern England on the Irish Sea; famous for its tower
Brighton - a city in East Sussex in southern England that is a popular resort; site of the University of Sussex
Bristol - an industrial city and port in southwestern England near the mouth of the River Avon
Cheddar - a village in southwestern England where cheddar cheese was first made
Leicester - an industrial city in Leicestershire in central England; built on the site of a Roman settlement
Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne - a port city in northeastern England on the River Tyne; a center for coal exports (giving rise to the expression `carry coals to Newcastle' meaning to do something unnecessary)
Pompey, Portsmouth - a port city in southern England on the English Channel; Britain's major naval base
Coventry - an industrial city in central England; devastated by air raids during World War II; remembered as the home of Lady Godiva in the 11th century
Gloucester - a city in southwestern England in Gloucestershire on the Severn
Reading - a city on the River Thames in Berkshire in southern England
Sunderland - a port and industrial city in northeastern England
Worcester - a cathedral city in west central England on the River Severn

England

noun Blighty, Albion their first visit to England
Related words
combining form Anglo-
like Anglomania
Translations
Engeland
انجلترااِنْـجِلْتِراانكلتراانكلترة
Англия
Anglaterra
Anglie
England
AnglioAnglujo
Inglismaa
انگلستان
Englanti
אנגליה
इंग्लैंड
Engleska
Anglia
Anglaterra
Inggris
England
イングランドえいこく英国イギリス
잉글랜드영국
AlbionAnglia
Anglia
Anglicko
Anglija
EngleskaЕнглеска
England
ประเทศอังกฤษ
انگلینڈ
AnhAnh Cát Lợinước Anh

England

[ˈɪŋglənd] NInglaterra f

England

[ˈɪŋglənd] nAngleterre f
in England → en Angleterre
to England → en Angleterre
I'm from England
BUT Je suis anglais.(e) England teamEngland team n
the England team → l'équipe m d'Angleterre

England

nEngland nt
adj attr the England teamdie englische Mannschaft

England

[ˈɪŋglənd] nInghilterra

England

اِنْـجِلْتِرا Anglie England England Αγγλία Inglaterra Englanti Angleterre Engleska Inghilterra イングランド 잉글랜드 Engeland England Anglia Inglaterra Англия England ประเทศอังกฤษ İngiltere nước Anh 英格兰
References in classic literature ?
Virtually then, for such a man as he was, life in England was over.