Galileo Galilei

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Ga·li·le·o Ga·li·lei

(găl′ə-lā′ō găl′ə-lā′) 1564-1642.
Italian mathematician and astronomer. Galileo constructed a telescope (1609) with which he discovered the moons of Jupiter and made other astronomical observations. He strongly advocated Copernicus's theory that the earth moves around the sun, which led to his interrogation by the Inquisition (1633) and a life sentence of house arrest.

Gal′i·le′an adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ga·li·le·o Ga·li·lei

(găl′ə-lā′ō găl′ə-lā′)
1564-1642. Italian astronomer, mathematician, and physicist who was the first to use a telescope to study the stars and planets. He discovered that Jupiter has moons and that Venus has phases like those of Earth's moon, suggesting that Venus orbits the sun.
Biography In 1609 Galileo heard of the invention of the spyglass, a tube with a piece of glass at each end that made objects appear closer and larger when you looked through it. He set about making his own. One night Galileo used his telescope (as they began to be called) to look up at the moon. He was astonished to see its mountains and valleys, since the moon was believed to be perfectly smooth. Galileo continued to observe the heavens, and a few months later he discovered Jupiter's four largest moons. As he studied them, he realized that they were orbiting Jupiter, not Earth. Galileo's observations convinced him that Copernicus had been right when he stated that Earth and all the planets orbit the sun. Many people feared Copernicus's theory, which overthrew the long-held belief that Earth was the center of the universe. Because he openly supported Copernicus's theory, Galileo was called before Church authorities and forced to declare that the theory was false. He was then put under house arrest on his own farm, where he was nonetheless allowed to continue his scientific work until the end of his life.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Galileo Galilei - Italian astronomer and mathematician who was the first to use a telescope to study the starsGalileo Galilei - Italian astronomer and mathematician who was the first to use a telescope to study the stars; demonstrated that different weights descend at the same rate; perfected the refracting telescope that enabled him to make many discoveries (1564-1642)
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References in classic literature ?
There was a light of nature in them, and this must have been what pleased me, so long-shut up to the studio-work of Pope.
Thus saith Cide Hamete the Mahometan philosopher; for there are many that by the light of nature alone, without the light of faith, have a comprehension of the fleeting nature and instability of this present life and the endless duration of that eternal life we hope for; but our author is here speaking of the rapidity with which Sancho's government came to an end, melted away, disappeared, vanished as it were in smoke and shadow.
I really don't remember," said East, speaking slowly and impressively, "to have come across one Latin or Greek sentence this half that I could go and construe by the light of nature. Whereby I am sure Providence intended cribs to be used."
You lay your plans, and never say a word, and expect me to tumble to them by light of nature. How was I to know you had anything on?"
Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.
Dinge --blomme, visse, brood-- ontmoet mekaar astraal in die tyd, word aangeraak deur die ligval op 'n bepaalde uur; ruil energiee uit en sluit 'n stil verbond: [...] Hierdie woorde herinner aan Paracelsus--wetenskaplike, plantkundige, alchemis en sterrekundige--se teorie: "The earth moulds [man's] shape, and then heaven endows this shape with the light of nature." Die gedig progresseer verder met Voerman se akwarel van geel kappertjies teen 'n blou agtergrond, soos die takke: