Lilburne


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Lilburne

(ˈlɪlˌbɜːn)
n
(Biography) John. ?1614-57, English Puritan pamphleteer and leader of the Levellers, a radical group prominent during the Civil War
References in periodicals archive ?
She also confirmed that the cloak she wore for the visit was steeped in British free-speech history and referenced 17th-century political figures John Lilburne and Richard Cromwell.
In New Zealand, a digital spatial soil information system (S-map) has been developed to integrate data available in various forms (maps, survey measurements, etc.), and to provide more elaborated soil information (Lilburne et al.
You also have a tattoo that was inspired by John Lilburne. I suspect there aren't many people in England who remember him.
The piece covers three historic eras through the eyes of four women: the leveller Elizabeth Lilburne, the suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, and two fictional modern MPs, interweaving their stories to explore how the voices of women have been heard over time.
(35) The historical John Lilburne was a vehement opponent of the proprietorial organisation of language: in England's Birth-Right Justified (1645), which Lindsay called the 'key-book to the advancing wave of democratic emotion that threatened to go entirely beyond the bourgeois objective and to demand real freedom for all', (36) Lilburne attacked 'the Patent of ingrossing the Preaching of the Word only to such men as weare Black and rough garments'.
The book details the actions of key figures including John Lilburne, Richard Overton, Thomas Rainsborough, and Oliver Cromwell.
Halliday, Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire 1 (2010) (quoting John Lilburne, The Prisoner's Most Mournful Cry 3 (1648)); Noam Biale, Beyond a Reasonable Disagreement: Judging Habeas Corpus, 83 U.
He clearly identifies with the lineage of English radicalism; he has claimed John Lilburne as his political inspiration, and the organisers of Levellers' Day have celebrated his success as one of their own.
60) John Lilburne 1614-1657: Leveller who spoke out for greater equality in the English Civil War.
In "An Ethical Literary Analysis of Brother to Dragons" Ling Bo analyzes the poem from the perspective of ethical literary criticism aiming to prove that Southern Whites' understanding of their identity in the institution of slavery was the main reason behind Lilburne's savage crime.