xenogenesis

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xen·o·gen·e·sis

 (zĕn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs, zē′nə-)
n.
The supposed production of offspring markedly different from either parent.

xen′o·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), xen′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

xenogenesis

(ˌzɛnəˈdʒɛnɪsɪs) or

xenogeny

n
1. (Biology) the supposed production of offspring completely unlike either parent
2. (Biology) another name for abiogenesis, alternation of generations
xenogenetic, ˌxenoˈgenic adj

xen•o•gen•e•sis

(ˌzɛn əˈdʒɛn ə sɪs, ˌzi nə-)

also xe•nog•e•ny

(zəˈnɒdʒ ə ni)

n.
2. the supposed generation of offspring completely and permanently different from the parent.
[1865–70]
xen`o•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) xen`o•gen′ic, adj.

xenogenesis, xenogeny

1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. — xenogenetic, xenogenic, adj.
See also: Biology
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny.xenogenic, — xenogenetic, adj.
See also: Organisms
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny. — xenogenic, xenogenetic, adj.
See also: Heredity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xenogenesis - the alternation of two or more different forms in the life cycle of a plant or animal
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals
digenesis, metagenesis - alternation of sexual and asexual generations
References in periodicals archive ?
The first of these two essays, by Theodora Goss and Riquelme, is an exploration of a concept they call the "Technological Imaginary," which signifies a key trope of Gothic science fiction, through a comparative analysis of Mary Shelley's seminal Gothic text Frankenstein (1818), and, at the other end of our timeline, Octavia Butler's science fiction trilogy, Xenogenesis (now marketed as Lilith's Brood, 2000).
Lilith's Brood (Dawn, Adulthood Rites, & Imago).
1) Later published together under the title Lilith's Brood (New York: Warner Aspect, 2000): Dawn, pp.