statute of limitations

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statute of limitations

n. pl. statutes of limitations
A legal restriction, as by law or court decision, on the time that is allowed to elapse between the arising of a legal claim and the filing of a suit based on such legal claim.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

statute of limitations

n
(Law) a legislative enactment prescribing the period of time within which proceedings must be instituted to enforce a right or bring an action at law. See also laches
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stat′ute of limita′tions


n.
a statute defining the period within which legal action may be taken.
[1760–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

statute of limitations

A statute that sets a time period during which legal proceedings must be begun.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.statute of limitations - a statute prescribing the time period during which legal action can be taken
law - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activity; "there is a law against kidnapping"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Attorney General supported the argument emphasizing that the suit was hopelessly out of time as it ought to have been filed one year after the cause of action arose in January, 2003.But through Dr John Khaminwa, Mr Kihoro urged the Appellate court that limitation of actions clauses no longer apply in view of Article 159 (2) (d) of the Constitution, requiring that justice be administered without undue regard to procedural technicalities.
(2) In its consultation paper the Law Commission described the law of limitation as "unfair, complex, uncertain and outdated": see Law Commission; The Limitation of Actions (Law Com No.
Under the Limitation of Actions Act, claims arising from contract disputes can only be made within six years of the alleged breach.
The statement of defence also refers to the Contributory Negligence Act and the Limitation of Actions Act, which addresses limitation periods for claims.
Attorneys and medical specialists from the UK offer 40 chapters covering medical defense organizations and the National Health Service (NHS) Litigation Authority; human rights; compensation schemes; funding clinical negligence claims; the coroner's inquest; preparation of medical evidence; the medical report and duties of the expert witness; the conduct of proceedings; consent; limitation of actions; product liability for medicinal products; damages awards; causation; epidemiology and statistics in litigation; and background on diseases in various specialties.
Bill # 71, amending the Limitation of Actions Act, was introduced on March 27, 2015, the second day of the Spring sitting and with unanimous consent on the same day proceeded to second reading.
WOOD, A Treatise ON the Limitation of Actions at Law and in Equity [section] 4, at 8-9 (4th ed.
Limitation of Actions [section][section] 221, 228 (2014) (describing
Such an interpretation would make nonsense of the Limitation of Actions Law." Kounis said that despite the fact that parliament approved a proposal on December 5 to extend the grace period, owners who relied on the advice that the 31/12/2013 deadline did not apply to them may have been spared the anguish of discovering that their claim, defence and counter-claim have suffered a sudden death.
The Roman law did not develop a law of adverse possession based on limitation of actions, although eventually limitation periods restricting when legal actions could be brought were introduced.
See also Margaret Fordham, "Sexual Abuse and the Limitation of Actions in Tort--A Case for Greater Flexibility" (2008) Sing JLS 292 at 296.