Lin Yutang


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Lin Yu•tang

(ˈlɪn ˈyuˈtɑŋ)
n.
(Lin Yü-t'ang), 1895–1976, Chinese author and philologist.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other personality was Lin Yutang. If Mao was the revolutionary who changed China, it was Lin Yutang, the foremost Chinese writer and scholar, who explained China to the world.
Consider philosopher Lin Yutang's instructions: "Besides the noble art of getting things done, there is the noble art of leaving things undone.
But to do this well, I can only revive and revitalize the thought of a largely forgotten figure, Lin Yutang, one who has already made this defense most eloquently.
Lin Yutang translated sections of Xie's diaries into English and published them introducing Xie's work to an international audience (see Lin and Xie; the book was also translated to French, German, Russian, Japanese, Korean, and Esperanto).
"I stumbled upon Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang's telling encomium: 'If you can spend a totally useless afternoon in a perfectly useless manner then you have learnt how to live"'- Actor Michael Simkins discovers a mantra which meets with his approval.
I'm good company" Actress Kathleen Turner, below "I have always wanted to sprinkle salt over him to see if he dissolves into slime like the slugs in my garden" Tory peer Lord Tebbit explaining why he would like to meet Alex Salmond, the former SNP leader "To remove the Christmas message from Christmas is like trying to understand Shakespeare's play about the Prince of Denmark without Hamlet" Dr George Carey, former Archbishop of Canterbury condemning the 'inappropriate' behaviour on Black Friday "I stumbled upon Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang's telling encomium: 'If you can spend a totally useless afternoon in a perfectly useless manner then you have learnt how to live"' Actor Michael Simkins discovers a mantra which meets with his approval
Art Gallery highlights include "A Journey to Fujian," examining the work of Lin Yutang and Bing Xin, along with Shoushan stone carvings and Dehua porcelain.
In his closing paragraph, he looked to the future and what it would hold for China, predicting: 'It may be that in a partial and limited way scientific culture will have to be accepted; but the mechanistic view of life, whether biological or sociological, is bound to arouse a profound, and let it be hoped, overwhelming latent hostility.' Rather than succumbing to what he described as 'the materialistic ambitions and ideals of the Occident', Rienaecker cited author Lin Yutang's belief that the Chinese temperament would settle for 'a house with several rooms, grain fields of several mow, a pool made from a basin and windows made from broken jars'.
As Chinese author and philosopher Lin Yutang said, "Besides the noble art of getting things done, there is the noble art of leaving things undone.
My favourite concerns Lin Yutang, the noted early 20th-century philosopher and apologist for traditional Chinese spirituality and culture.
The following wise statement from the ancient Chinese poet Lin Yutang should be the mantra of all holistic therapists:
This study focuses on the body-part hand in Mandarin Chinese and Spanish with the majority of the data taken from Chinese Mandarin Online Dictionary and Web edition of Lin Yutang's Chinese-English Dictionary of Modern Usage.