Linarite


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Li`nar´ite

    (lė`när´īt)
n.1.(Min.) A hydrous sulphate of lead and copper occurring in bright blue monoclinic crystals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rule has investigated phenomenon such as a possible spin nematic phase in linarite, which could potentially be used in spintronic technologies to transport information at high speed, resistance-free, producing low heat and requiring little power.
These include arsentsumebite, tsumebite, corkite, fornacite, duftite, caledonite, kettnerite, linarite, leadhillite, brochantite, mimetite, pyromorphite, vanadinite and wulfenite.
Neutron scattering at ANSTO has contributed to building evidence for the existence of a highly exotic and elusive state of matter, known as a magnetic spin nematic phase in a natural mineral called linarite.
These crystals, to 1.5 cm, are darkly colored and mirror-faced enough to suggest linarite, and are most surely not to be confused with the new sodalite-coated crystals of nepheline from the Kokcha Valley, these latter being baby-blue and not lustrous.
The witherite, calcite, fluorite, barite, linarite, barytocalcite and plumbogummite have never been beaten, mimetite from Dry Gill (the variety known as campylite) is unique, and the recent finds of boracite from Boulby mine have set new standards for the species.
barytocalcite, hematite, quartz, aragonite, siderite, linarite, caledonite and mimetite.
Other species for which the area was a renowned source of collector specimens include plumbogummite, linarite, hemimorphite, caledonite, leadhillite, scheelite and apatite.
Other minerals found there include the sulfide minerals chalcopyrite, galena, glaucodot, marcasite, pyrite and sphalerite, as well as anglesite, barite, brochantite, "nail-head" calcite, devilline, dolomite, linarite, malachite, quartz, schulenbergite, serpierite, smolyaninovite and wroewolfeite.
One of these pieces, a linarite from Roughton Gill mine, Caldbeck, (then a new find) was a sufficiently noteworthy addition to the collection to deserve mention by Lazarus Fletcher in his history of important specimens acquired by the museum.
According to the Gobins, however, nice wulfenite, cerussite, calcite, hemimorphite, linarite and gypsum specimens have been trickling out of several mostly inactive mines in central Iran for the last three years, and in Munich a number of these appeared in good-if-not-great examples which, of course, offer promise for the future.
The most outstanding of these non-Mexican specimens included California gold, Tsumeb wulfenite, New Mexico linarite (perhaps the world's best, from the Blanchard claim), and Arizona azurite.
Fine examples of cerussite, dioptase, malachite, azurite, wulfenite, smithsonite and vanadinite have been collected there, as well as some of the finest known examples of a number of rarer species such as boleite, diaboleite, caledonite, hydrocerussite, linarite, matlockite and leadhillite.