Lincoln


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Related to Lincoln: Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln University

Lin·coln 1

 (lĭng′kən)
1. A city of eastern England northeast of Nottingham. Located on the site of Roman, Saxon, and Danish settlements, it was first chartered in 1157.
2. The capital of Nebraska, in the southeast part of the state southwest of Omaha. Founded in 1864 as Lancaster, it was renamed when it was chosen as the state capital in 1867.

Lin·coln 2

 (lĭng′kən)
n.
Any of a breed of sheep with long wool, developed in Lincolnshire, a county of eastern England.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lincoln

(ˈlɪŋkən)
n
1. (Placename) a city in E central England, administrative centre of Lincolnshire: an important ecclesiastical and commercial centre in the Middle Ages; Roman ruins, a castle (founded by William the Conqueror) and a famous cathedral (begun in 1086). Pop: 85 963 (2001). Latin name: Lindum
2. (Placename) a city in SE Nebraska: state capital; University of Nebraska (1869). Pop: 235 594 (2003 est)
3. (Placename) short for Lincolnshire
4. (Breeds) a breed of long-woolled sheep, originally from Lincolnshire

Lincoln

(ˈlɪŋkən)
n
(Biography) Abraham. 1809–65, US Republican statesman; 16th president of the US. His fame rests on his success in saving the Union in the Civil War (1861–65) and on his emancipation of slaves (1863); assassinated by John Wilkes Booth
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lin•coln

(ˈlɪŋ kən)

n.
1. Abraham, 1809–65, 16th president of the U.S. 1861–65.
2. the capital of Nebraska, in the SE part. 209,192.
3. a city in Lincolnshire, in E central England. 73,200.
5. one of an English breed of large mutton sheep noted for their heavy fleece of coarse, long wool.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lincoln - 16th President of the United StatesLincoln - 16th President of the United States; saved the Union during the American Civil War and emancipated the slaves; was assassinated by Booth (1809-1865)
2.Lincoln - capital of the state of Nebraska; located in southeastern Nebraska; site of the University of Nebraska
University of Nebraska - a university in Lincoln, Nebraska
Cornhusker State, Nebraska, NE - a midwestern state on the Great Plains
3.Lincoln - long-wooled mutton sheep originally from Lincolnshire
domestic sheep, Ovis aries - any of various breeds raised for wool or edible meat or skin
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Gaston Cleric had arrived in Lincoln only a few weeks earlier than I, to begin his work as head of the Latin Department.
I did not go home for my first summer vacation, but stayed in Lincoln, working off a year's Greek, which had been my only condition on entering the freshman class.
He was a fine swarthy fellow, with dark hair and large moustachios, who rode a-hunting in clothes of Lincoln green, with russet boots on his feet, and a bugle slung over his shoulder like the guard of a long stage.
'The four-and-twenty Lincoln greens turned pale, with the exception of their four-and-twenty noses, which were unchangeable.
The Abraham Lincoln had been well chosen and equipped for her new destination.
At that moment Commander Farragut was ordering the last moorings to be cast loose which held the Abraham Lincoln to the pier of Brooklyn.
Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, given November 19, 1863 on the battlefield near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, USA
He had met the merchant, from whom he was wont to buy Lincoln green, coming along the road; and had made known his wants in few words.
"Unless it be Eric o' Lincoln," said Arthur modestly; "and I well know how you paid him out at the Fair."
Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln's Inn Hall.
Then he called up a messenger in whom he placed great trust, and bade him saddle his horse and make ready to go to Lincoln Town to see whether he could find anyone there that would do his bidding and win the reward.
Yet here stood the chair, with the old Lincoln coat of arms, and the oaken flowers and foliage, and the fierce lion's head at the summit, the whole, apparently, in as perfect preservation as when it had first been placed in the Earl of Lincoln's hall.