infrared

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in·fra·red

 (ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
adj. Abbr. IR
1. Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between microwaves and red visible light in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 300 gigahertz and 400 terahertz and wavelengths between 1 millimeter and 750 nanometers.
2. Generating, using, or sensitive to infrared radiation.
n.
Infrared light or the infrared part of the spectrum.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

infrared

(ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd)
n
(General Physics) the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with a longer wavelength than light but a shorter wavelength than radio waves; radiation with wavelength between 0.8 micrometres and 1 millimetre
adj
(General Physics) of, relating to, using, or consisting of radiation lying within the infrared: infrared radiation.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in`fra•red′

or in`fra-red′,



n.
1. the part of the invisible spectrum that is contiguous to the red end of the visible spectrum and that comprises electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths from 800 nm to 1 mm.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or using the infrared or its component rays: infrared radiation. Compare ultraviolet.
[1825–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·fra·red

(ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
Relating to the invisible part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths longer than those of visible red light but shorter than those of microwaves. See more at electromagnetic spectrum.
Did You Know? In 1800 the astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered infrared light when he was exploring the relationship between heat and light. Herschel used a prism to split a beam of sunlight into a rainbow of colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet) and measured how hot a thermometer got when it was placed in each of the various bands. Then he tried placing the thermometer just outside the red band, where there was no visible color at all. The thermometer heated up, just as if light were shining on it. Further experiments showed that this invisible form of light behaved just like visible light in many ways; for example, it could be reflected by a mirror. We now call this form of light infrared light. Another kind of invisible light, ultraviolet light, is found just beyond the violet end of the spectrum.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infrared - the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum; electromagnetic wave frequencies below the visible range; "they could sense radiation in the infrared"
infrared spectrum - the spectrum of infrared radiation
frequence, frequency, oftenness - the number of occurrences within a given time period; "the frequency of modulation was 40 cycles per second"; "the frequency of his seizures increased as he grew older"
2.infrared - electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths longer than visible light but shorter than radio waves
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
Adj.1.infrared - having or employing wavelengths longer than light but shorter than radio waves; lying outside the visible spectrum at its red end; "infrared radiation"; "infrared photography"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
infraroig
infračervený
infrarødinfrarød stråling
infrapuna
적외선
infrarødinfrarød stråling
infravermelho
infrarödinfraröd strålning

infrared

[ˈɪnfrəˈred] ADJ [rays, light] → infrarrojo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

infrared

infra-red [ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd] adj
[light, radiation] → infrarouge
[equipment, sensor] → infrarouge; [camera] → infrarouge
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

infrared

adjinfrarot
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

infrared

[ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd]
1. adjinfrarosso/a
2. n (raggio) → infrarosso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

infrared

adj infrarrojo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The height of the trees and the thickness of the boles exceeded anything which I in my town-bred life could have imagined, shooting upwards in magnificent columns until, at an enormous distance above our heads, we could dimly discern the spot where they threw out their side-branches into Gothic upward curves which coalesced to form one great matted roof of verdure, through which only an occasional golden ray of sunshine shot downwards to trace a thin dazzling line of light amidst the majestic obscurity.
Far away, beyond even the limits of the quivering line of light, there was something in the sky which seemed a little blacker than the cloud.
On our right a line of light marked the door of the room which had sent its ray across the night; and behind the door I heard a woman's voice droning querulously.
As they spied me there was a concerted rush by those nearest the entrance where we stood, but a line of radium bulbs inset along the threshold of their chamber brought them to a sudden halt--evidently they dared not cross that line of light.
Now when the spirits which were in the meadow had tarried seven days, on the eighth they were obliged to proceed on their journey, and, on the fourth day after, he said that they came to a place where they could see from above a line of light, straight as a column, extending right through the whole heaven and through the earth, in colour resembling the rainbow, only brighter and purer; another day's journey brought them to the place, and there, in the midst of the light, they saw the ends of the chains of heaven let down from above: for this light is the belt of heaven, and holds together the circle of the universe, like the under-girders of a trireme.
Thirty-nine was a corner room, at the end of the passage, but late though it was--"One" struck gently downstairs--a line of light under the door showed that some one was still awake.
In the bows he stood for some time, leaning with folded arms against a pillar, his eyes fixed upon the line of lights ahead.
David's Hall was invisible, but like strangely-hung lanterns in an empty space he saw the line of lights from the great house gleam through the obscurity.
In the early 90's, Altinboga manufactured a line of light duty commercial vehicles powered by the diesel engines.
A line of light range loader cranes with capacities from 4 to 12 tons combines strength and reliability with ease of use.
The vehicle features a front end with composite horizontal full LED daytime running lights, headlamps that are linked by a continuous, thin line of light underlining the horizontal front layout, triangular fog lights below the headlamps and Hyundai's signature Cascading Grille, two large LCD displays and Blind-spot View Monitor.
New York (AirGuideBusiness - Business & Industry News) Tue, Feb 4, 2014 The World Aircraft Co., based in Paris, Tenn., is set to launch a line of light sport aircraft.