descriptive linguistics

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Related to Linguistic analysis: symbolic logic

descriptive linguistics

n
(Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the study of the description of the internal phonological, grammatical, and semantic structures of languages at given points in time without reference to their histories or to one another. Also called: synchronic linguistics Compare historical linguistics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

descrip′tive linguis′tics


n.
the study of the grammar, classification, and arrangement of the features of a language at a given time, without reference to its history or comparison to other languages.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

descriptive linguistics

The study of a language at a particular stage in its development without relating it to other stages or other languages.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.descriptive linguistics - a description (at a given point in time) of a language with respect to its phonology and morphology and syntax and semantics without value judgments
linguistics - the scientific study of language
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
phonemics, phonology - the study of the sound system of a given language and the analysis and classification of its phonemes
morphophonemics - the study of the phonological realization of the allomorphs of the morphemes of a language
derivation - (descriptive linguistics) the process whereby new words are formed from existing words or bases by affixation; "`singer' from `sing' or `undo' from `do' are examples of derivations"
prescriptive linguistics - an account of how a language should be used instead of how it is actually used; a prescription for the `correct' phonology and morphology and syntax and semantics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Deskriptive Linguistik
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While WannaCry has taken code used by Lazarus Group, a (http://www.ibtimes.com/wannacry-ransomware-news-linguistic-analysis-offers-insight-about-attackers-2544205) linguistic analysis of the ransom notes delivered to infected machines suggests the attackers are native Chinese speakers.
For decades, philosophy in English-speaking countries has been dominated by various forms of scientism such as linguistic analysis and logical positivism.
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Fonetic, a voice and text management solutions firm, has announced that Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria (BBVA) (BBVA.MC) is rolling out the Fonetic linguistic analysis and trading compliance solution.
Last week Taia Global, another IT security company, said a linguistic analysis of the alleged hacker messages points to Russian speakers rather than Korean.
Deep Linguistic Analysis is used to identify the subject the author is discussing.
The volume comes to a head with its linguistic analysis of Emine Sevgi Ozdamar's Mutter Zunge, although she also considers other writers such as Yoko Tawada, Eva Hoffman, and Vassilis Alexakis.
Horsham, Pennsylvania-based Verilogue, active since 2006, has 31 staff and focuses on worldwide digital capture and linguistic analysis of real-world encounters between physicians, nurses, patients, and caregivers in North America, Europe, and Asia.
One of the long-standing bugbears for psycholinguistics, notably starting with Chomsky's transformational grammars, has to determine which parts of a given linguistic analysis have measurable psychological consequences (e.g., in reading times, errors, etc.) and which do not.
This may rest on a confusion about the role of language in linguistic analysis: language need not be taken by linguistic philosophers as the primary object of philosophy, while an analysis of language (usage) may still be taken as one crucial or even the privileged method of getting at concepts.
"We consider that part of the compelling independent evidence that she was working for North Korea." The document also showed that the FBI carried out a linguistic analysis of Kim's statement, "which demonstrates that the words she used are North Korean (dialect)." South Korean officials also "strongly suspected" North Korea's involvement from the beginning of their probe and reached the same conclusion, another document shows.