linked list

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linked list

n
(Computer Science) computing a list in which each item contains both data and a pointer to one or both neighbouring items, thus eliminating the need for the data items to be ordered in memory
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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It covers arrays, linked lists, queues, searching and sorting, stacks, trees, multi-way search trees, hashing, files, and graphs.
In terms of its implementation linked list can be categorized into imperative, circular, abstract data type (ADT), generic, sentinel and array based linked lists.
In terms of structure it was suggested that both singly and doubly linked lists should be covered as core topic.
Beginning with a review of basic Java principles, the work covers topics such as flat files, arrays and linked lists, collections, estimating asymtotic efficiency, recursion, tree and sorting, searching, and graphs.
Some other subjects discussed include a fuzzy multi-criteria approach to assessment of software quality, verification of attributes in linked lists using an ant colony metaphor, and genetic programming for cross-release fault count predictions in large and complex software projects.
The [r.sub.3] coordinates are used in creating linked lists of particles in cells prior to the force calculations.
Generalizing this to all particles in the system, a linked list of all the particles contained in each cell is constructed every timestep.
"For larger N, use an array of size near M indexed by the high order bits of the data, of pointers to sorted linked lists containing (the low order bits of) the data.
After an introduction to Scala, it covers the basics of object-orientation and software development, object-orientation in Scala, abstraction and polymorphism, GUIs (graphical user interfaces) and graphics, other collection types, stacks and queues, multithreading and concurrency, low-level multithreading and Java libraries, stream input/output and XML, networking, linked lists, priority queues, refactoring, recursion, trees, regular expressions and context-free parsers, binary heaps, direct access binary files, spatial trees, augmenting trees, and hash tables.
In particular, we would like to draw attention to some additional work on parallel nested dissection algorithms for solving sparse matrices [3], some earlier data parallel algorithms involving multiply linked lists [5], and some alternate algorithms for region labeling [4].