liquidus

(redirected from Liquidus line)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

liq·ui·dus

 (lĭk′wĭ-dəs)
n.
The minimum temperature at which all components of a mixture, such as an alloy, can be in a liquid state.

liquidus

(ˈlɪkwɪdəs)
n
(General Physics) thermodynamics the line on a graph of temperature versus composition, above which a substance is in liquid form
References in periodicals archive ?
By increasing the number of graphite nodules during solidification, the rate of release of latent heat due to graphite crystallization increases, and the end of freezing temperature is raised above the cementite liquidus line, preventing carbide formation.
Lowering the temperatures of the liquid phase, a possible excess of graphite contained in the liquid phase becomes solid at the liquidus line (point A) and the concentration of graphite in the liquid phase is decreasing.
Metal temperature areas that are over liquidus line and have greater temperature than melting metal, have a relatively small surface.