Lise Meitner


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Lise Meitner: Marie Curie, Otto Hahn
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lise Meitner - Swedish physicist (born in Austria) who worked in the field of radiochemistry with Otto Hahn and formulated the concept of nuclear fission with Otto Frisch (1878-1968)Lise Meitner - Swedish physicist (born in Austria) who worked in the field of radiochemistry with Otto Hahn and formulated the concept of nuclear fission with Otto Frisch (1878-1968)
References in periodicals archive ?
Physicist Lise Meitner helped to discover and explain nuclear fission, but her role was unacknowledged by her friend and collaborator Otto Hahn, who won the 1944 Nobel Prize for the breakthrough.
A German astronomer was the first woman to receive a salary as a scientist Annie Cannon (1863-1941) American suffragist and astronomer, instrumental in how astronomy classifies stars Mary Proctor (1862-1957) Popularised astronomy with books for children Marie Curie (1867-1934) Became the first woman to win Nobel Prize Lise Meitner (1878) Austrian-Swedish physicist whose research led to the development of nuclear reactors Amalie Noether (1882-1935) Iconic woman in the history of mathematics Laurel Clark (1961-2003) Clark died along with six other crew members in the Columbia shuttle disaster.
Newton, Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo were realist, so too in the twentieth century were the physicists Lise Meitner, Niels Bohr, and Enrico Fermi.
40 Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Physicist mother of the atom bomb.
Linked with Moscovium - (Discovered in a laboratory in Moscow); Copernicium - (Nicolaus Copernicus, Scientist); Roentgenium - (Wilhelm Rontgen); Meitnerium -(Lise Meitner); Lawrencium - (Ernest Lawrence); Nobelium - (Alfred Nobel), and Rutherfordium - Ernest Rutherford, New Zealand).
In a two-page section on women Nobel Laureates, Scheckel gives specific numbers but only some names on the first page, then spends the second page discussing Lise Meitner, who did not actually receive a Nobel prize (wrongly, according to some).
1938: Based on observations by her German colleague Otto Hahn, Jewish physicist Lise Meitner works out the first model of nuclear fission.
Ball cites historian Alan Beyerchen's account of an agonized conversation with Lise Meitner over the first wave of anti-Semitic dismissals: "'What should I do?' he asked...
And there are many others -- nuclear physicist Lise Meitner, environmental pioneer Rachel Carson, mathematician Ada Lovelace, Nobel Prize-winning biochemist Gertrude Elion, and astronaut Sally Ride.