Classical Chinese

(redirected from Literary Chinese)

Classical Chinese

n.
The written form of Chinese from about the fifth century bc to the end of the Han dynasty in ad 220.
adj.
Of or relating to Classical Chinese.
References in periodicals archive ?
He remained with the Indian Army in the period before independence but after Partition and demobilisation, he returned to England to read Modern and Literary Chinese at the London University School of African and Oriental Studies (SOAS).
He also contextualizes the idea of the "Mystic Stone" by linking it with the "Wizards' Basket," his rendering of vidyadhara-pitaka (chiming Zang), an elusive but often-employed concept that Copp aptly shows continued to evolve over the course of several centuries and that was loosely conceptualized using a variety of terms in literary Chinese (pp.
As one of the earliest to translate Western literary texts into Chinese, Lin translated with the medium of literary Chinese that was still the main language of Chinese literature at that time.
In Literary Remains, Eileen Cheng makes a strong case for the intentional persistence of literary Chinese in Lu Xun's work, including his prose poetry, in the form of a consistent, traumatic recurrence of the loss of literary Chinese at the hands of the New Culture Movement, hands which include Lu Xun's own.
In addition to Cheng's analysis, I believe that there are situations in which literary Chinese recurs in Lu Xun's work in a non-traumatic, constructive manner, as a source for baihua SIS poetics: see Nick Admussen, "A Music for Baihua: Lu Xun's Wild Grass and 'A Good Story,'" Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 31 (December 2009), 1-22.
He transcreated the Sanskrit Sutras into such a literary Chinese languages, his style was so distinct, possessing flowing smoothness, that generations after generations draw their spiritual values from his translations.
Lin Shu is best known for his translation of nearly two hundred titles, mostly novels, into Literary Chinese.
It was written covertly at night, on scrap paper taken from used notebooks, in literary Chinese characters, just in case his house was raided by the French surete.
Yiu has selected a provocatively broad range of material: novels both comfortably familiar and decidedly not, critical essays, academic and public lectures, and poetry written in literary Chinese (kanshi).
It is, with some minor exceptions noted below, a good translation that serves as a useful crib for students of literary Chinese and of the history of traditional Chinese political thought.
Hence, while it is obvious from the various forms of literary Chinese in the text that Okajima was building on an established tradition of Nagasaki Sinology - what in his day was referred to as kiyo [Chinese Text Omitted] and towa [Chinese Text Omitted] studies - he was also learning a great deal of Chinese from native informants.