novel

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nov·el 1

 (nŏv′əl)
n.
1. A fictional prose narrative of considerable length, typically having a plot that is unfolded by the actions, speech, and thoughts of the characters.
2. The literary genre represented by novels.

[Ultimately from Old Italian novella, piece of news, chit-chat, tale, novella, from Vulgar Latin *novella, from neuter pl. of Latin novellus, diminutive of novus, new; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

nov·el 2

 (nŏv′əl)
adj.
Strikingly new, unusual, or different. See Synonyms at new.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin novellus, diminutive of novus; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

nov′el·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an extended work in prose, either fictitious or partly so, dealing with character, action, thought, etc, esp in the form of a story
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the novel the literary genre represented by novels
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (usually plural) obsolete a short story or novella, as one of those in the Decameron of Boccaccio
[C15: from Old French novelle, from Latin novella (narrātiō) new (story); see novel2]

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
adj
of a kind not seen before; fresh; new; original: a novel suggestion.
[C15: from Latin novellus new, diminutive of novus new]

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
n
(Law) Roman law a new decree or an amendment to an existing statute
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nov•el1

(ˈnɒv əl)

n.
a fictitious prose narrative of considerable length and complexity, portraying characters and usu. presenting a sequential organization of action and scenes.
[1560–70; < Italian novella (storia) new kind of story]
nov`el•is′tic, adj.
nov`el•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

nov•el2

(ˈnɒv əl)

adj.
of a new kind; different from anything seen or known before: a novel idea.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French, Old French) < Latin novellus fresh, young, novel, diminutive of novus new]
syn: See new.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

novel

A fictitious narrative in which characters and action are usually a reflection of real life.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novel - an extended fictional work in prosenovel - an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
detective novel, mystery novel - novel in which the reader is challenged to solve a puzzle before the detective explains it at the end
dime novel, penny dreadful - a melodramatic paperback novel
novelette, novella - a short novel
roman a clef - a novel in which actual persons and events are disguised as fictional characters
romance - a novel dealing with idealized events remote from everyday life
roman fleuve - a French novel in the form of a long chronicle of a family or other social group
2.novel - a printed and bound book that is an extended work of fiction; "his bookcases were filled with nothing but novels"; "he burned all the novels"
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
Adj.1.novel - original and of a kind not seen before; "the computer produced a completely novel proof of a well-known theorem"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"
2.novel - pleasantly new or different; "common sense of a most refreshing sort"
new - not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered; "a new law"; "new cars"; "a new comet"; "a new friend"; "a new year"; "the New World"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

novel

1
noun story, tale, fiction, romance, narrative He had all but finished writing a first novel.
Quotations
"Yes - oh dear yes - the novel tells a story" [E.M. Forster Aspects of the Novel]
"There are three rules for writing the novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are" [W. Somerset Maugham]
"novel: a short story padded" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"If you try to nail anything down in the novel, either it kills the novel, or the novel gets up and walks away with the nail" [D.H. Lawrence Phoenix]

novel

2
adjective new, different, original, fresh, unusual, innovative, uncommon, singular, ground-breaking, left-field (informal) Staging your own murder mystery party is a novel way to entertain a group of friends.
common, traditional, usual, ordinary, ancient, old-fashioned, customary, run-of-the-mill
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

novel

adjective
1. Not the same as what was previously known or done:
2. Not usual or ordinary:
Slang: offbeat.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
جَديد وَغريبروايةرِوَايَةٌرِوايَه
románneotřelýnezvyklýnovýoriginální
romanhidtil ukendtny
رمان
romaaniuudenlainenuusi
उपन्यासकथाकहानी
roman
regény
novel
nÿr; frumlegur, nÿstárlegurskáldsaga
小説新奇
소설
jaunsnebijisromāns
roman
nezvyklýromán
roman
roman
นิยาย
romanyeni ve farklıalışılmamış
tiểu thuyết

novel

[ˈnɒvəl]
A. ADJ [idea, suggestion, method] → original, novedoso
it was a novel experience for himera una experiencia nueva para él
B. Nnovela f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

novel

[ˈnɒvəl]
nroman m
adj (= new) [idea, approach] → original(e); [experience, situation] → nouveau(nouvelle)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

novel

1
nRoman m

novel

2
adjneu(artig)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

novel

[ˈnɒvl]
1. adjoriginale, nuovo/a after n
2. n (Literature) → romanzo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

novel1

(ˈnovəl) noun
a book telling a long story in prose. the novels of Charles Dickens.
ˈnovelist noun
the writer of a novel. Dickens was a great novelist.

novel2

(ˈnovəl) adjective
new and strange. a novel idea.
ˈnoveltyplural ˈnovelties noun
1. newness and strangeness. It took her a long time to get used to the novelty of her surroundings.
2. something new and strange. Snow is a novelty to people from hot countries.
3. a small, cheap manufactured thing sold as a toy or souvenir. a stall selling novelties.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

novel

رِوَايَةٌ román roman Roman μυθιστόρημα novela romaani roman roman romanzo 小説 소설 roman roman powieść romance роман roman นิยาย roman tiểu thuyết 小说
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
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