remains

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re·mains

 (rĭ-mānz′)
pl.n.
1. All that is left after other parts have been taken away, used up, or destroyed.
2. A dead body or parts of a dead body.
3. The unpublished writings of a deceased author.
4. Ancient ruins or fossils.

remains

(rɪˈmeɪnz)
pl n
1. any pieces, scraps, fragments, etc, that are left unused or still extant, as after use, consumption, the passage of time, etc: the remains of a meal; archaeological remains.
2. the body of a dead person; corpse
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Also called: literary remains the unpublished writings of an author at the time of his or her death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.remains - any object that is left unused or still extantremains - any object that is left unused or still extant; "I threw out the remains of my dinner"
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
archeological remains - a relic that has been excavated from the soil
fossil - the remains (or an impression) of a plant or animal that existed in a past geological age and that has been excavated from the soil
2.remains - the dead body of a human beingremains - the dead body of a human being; "the cadaver was intended for dissection"; "the end of the police search was the discovery of a corpse"; "the murderer confessed that he threw the stiff in the river"; "honor comes to bless the turf that wraps their clay"
dead body, body - a natural object consisting of a dead animal or person; "they found the body in the lake"
cremains - the remains of a dead body after cremation

remains

plural noun
2. corpse, body, bones, skeleton, carcass, cadaver The remains of a man had been found.
3. relics, heritage, antiquities There are Roman remains all around us.

remains

noun
1. What remains after a part has been used or subtracted:
2. A mark or remnant that indicates the former presence of something:
3. The physical frame of a dead person or animal:
Slang: stiff.
Translations
بَقايارُفاتفَضَلَه، الباقي
ostatkytroskyzbytky
de jordiske resterlevningerrest
jäänteet
ostaci
maradékok
jarîneskar leifar, líkleifar
遺物
잔여물
pozostatkyzvyšky
ostanki
kvarlevor
สิ่งที่เหลืออยู่
artıklarcesetkalıntıkalıntılarölü
đồ thừa

remains

[rɪˈmeɪnz] NPL [of building] → restos mpl; [of food] → sobras fpl, restos mpl
the remains of the picniclos restos or las sobras del picnic
human remainsrestos mpl humanos
Roman remainsruinas fpl romanas

remains

[rɪˈmeɪnz] npl
(= leftovers) → restes mpl
the remains of the picnic → les restes du pique-nique
(= dead body) → restes mpl
human remains → des restes humains
(= ancient ruins) → vestiges mpl
Roman remains → des vestiges romains

remains

pl (of meal)Reste pl; (of fortune, army)Rest m; (of building)Überreste pl; (= archaeological remains)Ruinen pl; his (mortal) remainsseine sterblichen Überreste; human remainsmenschliche Überreste pl

remains

[rɪˈmeɪnz] npl (gen) → resti mpl; (of food) → avanzi mpl
the remains of his fortune → ciò che restava del suo patrimonio

remain

(rəˈmein) verb
1. to be left. Only two tins of soup remain; Very little remained of the cinema after the fire; A great many things still remain to be done.
2. to stay; not to leave. I shall remain here.
3. to continue to be. The problem remains unsolved.
reˈmainder (-də) noun
the amount or number that is left when the rest has gone, been taken away etc. I've corrected most of the essays – the remainder will get done tomorrow.
reˈmains noun plural
1. what is left after part has been taken away, eaten, destroyed etc. the remains of a meal.
2. a dead body. to dispose of someone's remains.

remains

بَقايا trosky levninger Überreste απομεινάρια restos jäänteet restes ostaci resti 遺物 잔여물 overblijfselen rester resztki restos, sobras останки kvarlevor สิ่งที่เหลืออยู่ kalıntı đồ thừa 残余

remains

n., pl. restos, despojos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Originating some years ago with a worldwide canvass for Jackson papers with the goal of systematically presenting Andrew JacksonAEs full extant literary remains, the project yielded photocopies of thousands of documents held by hundreds of libraries, archives, and private owners.
It was, moreover, the Catholic Reformation that produced the Bollandists, the Jesuit group charged with the Herculean task of gathering and assembling the scattered literary remains of medieval sanctity and deploying them in their most recognizable form, the Acta Sanctorum.
2) John Kaye's literary remains, for example, survived as the family became more affluent, influential and affluent in successive generations.
However, her biographer, Laman Blanchard, tacked these essays on Scott's heroines on to the end of Volume Two of his book, Life and Literary Remains of L.
The Omniana essay was later reprinted by Henry Nelson Coleridge in The Literary Remains of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1836).
But there are revealing accounts too of the "moral bases" of Jacob Zuma's rise to power in South Africa by Tom Lodge (chapter 13); of the power available to elite women in the middle ages ("Lifting the tapestry: the designs of Yolande of Aragon, 1381-1422" by Zita Rohr); of the efforts of universities in sixteenth century Germany to use print to forge a positive public image (by Richard Kirwan), and an intriguing demonstration of how a close reading of the literary remains of an individual (in this instance of Leonardo da Vinci by Barco Versiero) can reveal otherwise occluded political perspectives (chapter 2).
Her account of the cottage industry Murry developed out of his dead wife's literary remains is familiar, but it nevertheless makes for enjoyably horrifying reading.
MacMullen argues that the literary remains of the third and fourth centuries all come from the elite members of the church.
Composed of sentences that read as if freshly minted, her literary remains have come to be regarded as all of a piece.
Wiseman's laboratory, where the literary remains of Ennius, Livy, Ovid, and many other Roman authors are subjected to rigorous analysis in light of the evidence of archaeology and other disciplines as well as Wiseman's own appraisal and interpretation of various Latin writers.
This volume does more than excavate the literary remains of a major figure from the '70s.
At the other extreme of confidence in finding a mastering pattern in Dickinson's literary remains, Martha Nell Smith and Ellen Louise Hart's influential 1998 Open Me Carefully: Emily Dickinson's Intimate Letters to Susan Huntington Dickinson looked at Dickinson through the lens of her intense, long-lived, mutual bond with her sister-in-law.