Little Tennessee River

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Little Tennessee River

A river, about 215 km (135 mi) long, of northeast Georgia, southwest North Carolina, and eastern Tennessee, where it joins the Tennessee River.
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It focuses on the Coweeta Creek archaeological site, located in the upper Little Tennessee Valley in southwestern North Carolina, to help explain and shed light on the characteristics of the Cherokee village sites.
He was a stellar bishop to our little Tennessee diocese: positive and energetic, encouraging, compassionate, friendly to conservative and liberal alike, pastoral, kind, a real servant-leader.
The walk is scheduled for Friday, May 4 at the Big Bear Shelter on the Little Tennessee River Greenway.
Tina Turner's little Tennessee town on Highway 19 has never seemed so appealing now that Mike McCurry's favourite song of praise has been revealed.
ABSTRACT--Discovered in 1973, the snail darter (percina tanasi Etnier) was extirpated from Little Tennessee River upon completion of Tellico Dam in 1979.
In the 1970s while the snail darter (Percina tanasi) was focusing national attention on the Tellico Dam on the Little Tennessee River, another dam project was threatening two listed mussels slightly to the west on the Duck River.
Another McKee offering, called the Little Tennessee River Tract, is located northwest of Franklin, next to the Needmore Tract, which consists of thousands of acres under the protection of area and regional conservation groups.
The name Abrams is a shortened reference to Abraham, the Cherokee chief of a village on the Little Tennessee near the mouth of what is now Abrams Creek.
The initial version of the AET report stated that in a 197,000-acre portion of the Little Tennessee River basin area, "Conventional forest-harvesting practices, although present in only 1.
Pteronarcys occurs from second- through seventh-order streams in the Little Tennessee River (LTR) drainage basin in western North Carolina, constituting a fairly large percentage of the invertebrate biomass through this range ([less than]1-47%, Grubaugh et al.
lt;IR> WILLIAM BARTRAM's </IR> Travels (1791) includes descriptions of Cherokee culture observed at first hand in the 1770s around the upper reaches of the Little Tennessee River.