little people


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Related to little people: dwarfism

little people

or

little folk

pl n
(European Myth & Legend) folklore small supernatural beings, such as elves, pixies, or leprechauns

lit′tle peo`ple


n.pl.
1. (in folklore) small, imaginary beings, as elves, fairies, or leprechauns.
2. the common people, esp. workers, small merchants, or the like, who lead conventional, presumably unremarkable lives.
3. small children.
4. midgets or dwarfs.
[1720–30]
References in classic literature ?
And yet for whom do the Little People of the Rocks turn aside?
Indeed, there was something in these pretty little people that inspired confidence--a graceful gentleness, a certain childlike ease.
"We must be very careful here," said the kind-hearted Woodman, "or we may hurt these pretty little people so they will never get over it."
The little people could do nothing without dear Newman Noggs.
It is my intention, therefore, to signify, that, as it is the nature of a kite to devour little birds, so is it the nature of such persons as Mrs Wilkins to insult and tyrannize over little people. This being indeed the means which they use to recompense to themselves their extreme servility and condescension to their superiors; for nothing can be more reasonable, than that slaves and flatterers should exact the same taxes on all below them, which they themselves pay to all above them.
And doesn't she train those little people! Ask the Indians, ask the traders, ask the soldiers; they'll tell you.
Indeed, it has always seemed to me that the Giant needed the little people more than the Pygmies needed the Giant.
But they should not have talked so loudly, for one day they were overheard by a fairy who had been gathering skeleton leaves, from which the little people weave their summer curtains, and after that Tony was a marked boy.
"We do not hunt game to-night, little people," he cried, "but men, and you love the flesh of men."
Odd little people! They are the unconscious comedians of the world's great stage.
David knows that all children in our part of London were once birds in the Kensington Gardens; and that the reason there are bars on nursery windows and a tall fender by the fire is because very little people sometimes forget that they have no longer wings, and try to fly away through the window or up the chimney.
But, especially after Everyman, it is dull reading for little people, and it is not in order to speak of this play that I write about Skelton.