live load

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Related to Live loads: Dynamic Load, wind loads

live load

 (līv)
n.
A moving, variable weight added to the dead load or intrinsic weight of a structure or vehicle.

live load

n
(General Engineering) a variable weight on a structure, such as moving traffic on a bridge. Also called: superload Compare dead load
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.live load - a variable load on a structure (e.g. a bridge) such as moving traffic
load, loading, burden - weight to be borne or conveyed
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the structural analysis of this bridge, the Michael Baker team developed a series of three-dimensional, finite-element models to establish the existing forces on the bridge, determine the new dead loads based on the proposed rehabilitation, calculate the modern-design live loads, and evaluate proposed construction sequencing.
The moving live loads (truck-train and tank) were generated over the bridge deck along the girder.
so, to improve and meet the international standards specified by AASTHO (STD and LRFD) and EN1991-2, the IRC live loads can be proportioned accordingly.
These brakes are sized to resist all live loads placed on the fixture such as robotic drilling equipment pressing on the wing skin, personnel walking on the fixture doing manual operations, and loading and unloading of parts.
This means that Aqua-Pipe is a standalone structural liner that can withstand all dead and live loads and internal pressures including vacuum without the help of the residual strength of the existing pipe.
The first part of the book discusses load combinations and standards for specific load types including dead loads, live loads, soil loads, flood loads, snow, rain, and ice loads.
While we talk of dead or static loads in buildings, that's the weight of the walls, floors and roofs, we also have live loads made up of you and me when we use the building, as well as the weight of snow or pressure from the wind.
The distribution of live loads and the self-weight of the slabs (transferred from the slabs to the beams) are based on the envelope distribution model.
The Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) is studying how jointless bridges respond to thermal movements and dead and live loads in a northern climate.