fallacy of many questions

(redirected from Loaded question)
Also found in: Idioms.

fallacy of many questions

n
(Logic) logic the rhetorical trick of asking a question that cannot be answered without admitting a presupposition that may be false, as have you stopped beating your wife?
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
It helped that the opposition tended to run away from Ronaldo when he had the ball, though tackling one of the Premiership's most elusive talents is as daunting a proposition as asking his feisty manager a loaded question.
Responding to their Olympic director of cycling Isabelle Gautheron's loaded question, "How have they gained so many tenths of seconds?
"I think it was a loaded question and they wanted me to say I hoped they'd lose.
The title - chosen by the school's head of politics (they didn't have one of those at Normanton Grammar) - was "Has the Labour Party lost its soul?" A loaded question, rather like "have you stopped beating your wife?", because it assumes that the party had a soul in the first place, which is a bit surreal.
I J Reilly,Liverpool: I think the ``quick vote''is rather a loaded question. It is not apathy that has overtaken faith - it is simply a loss of faith.
Years ago some people here got what they wanted down the barrel of a loaded gun - now they do it at the end of a loaded question.
Yesterday, Gerry Ryan asked his listeners a simple question: "Do you forgive Wayne O'Donoghue?" Which in itself is a bit of a loaded question.
Well, as someone who went to the same school as Rooney and knows his teachers, the answer to that disgracefully loaded question is no.
Daddy asked him the kind of devious, loaded question market-researchers in Baghdad ask when Saddam Hussein needs to be told that 100% of Iraqis are behind him: "Do you think your own life and future career might have rather better prospects if you were not encumbered with the burden of a disgraced father hovering in the background?" Aitken asked his 14-year-old boy.
This whole issue came from a loaded question about my future and if I would be sacked.
He admitted that being asked if the group was more important than God was a "loaded question."
It's a loaded question. "Enough," like "a lot," means different things to different people -- it could mean every night, twice a week or twice a month.