lobbying

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lob·by

(lŏb′ē)
n. pl. lob·bies
1. A hall, foyer, or waiting room at or near the entrance to a building, such as a hotel or theater.
2. A public room next to the assembly chamber of a legislative body.
3. A group of persons engaged in trying to influence legislators or other public officials in favor of a specific cause: the banking lobby; the labor lobby.
v. lob·bied, lob·by·ing, lob·bies
v. intr.
To try to influence the thinking of legislators or other public officials for or against a specific cause: lobbying for stronger environmental safeguards; lobbied against the proliferation of nuclear arms.
v. tr.
1. To try to influence public officials on behalf of or against (proposed legislation, for example): lobbied the bill through Congress; lobbied the bill to a negative vote.
2. To try to influence (an official) to take a desired action.

[Medieval Latin lobia, monastic cloister, of Germanic origin.]

lobbying

(ˈlɒbɪɪŋ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics activity that aims to influence legislators, etc in the formulation of policy
Translations
Lobbying

lobbying

[ˈlɒbɪɪŋ] Ncabildeo m

lobbying

[ˈlɒbiɪŋ] nlobbying m

lobbying

nBeeinflussung fvon Abgeordneten (durch Lobbys); the Prime Minister refused to be influenced by lobbyingder Premierminister wollte sich nicht von Lobbys or Interessenverbänden beeinflussen lassen
References in periodicals archive ?
As far as the President is concerned, there's like a concerted effort on the part of lobby groups to influence UN officials to indict and convict the President in a court of public opinion," Roque said.
President Uhuru Kenyatta is staring at a court battle with lobby groups challenging the 'unconstitutional' composition of his new Cabinet.
County communication director Richard Chacha said some lobby groups in Mombasa and Nairobi were soliciting for bribes from the county following the report in which the administration has been cited over inaccuracies in financial records.
Candidates have to be heavily connected to lobby groups like Wall Street, National Rifle Association, AIPAC, Military-Industrial Complex and those that are very wealthy.
Finally, it is important to note that, whilst everything claimed about renewable energy by Mr Arnott is not based on fact, but on the opinions of industry lobby groups, I should point out that the Offshore Demonstrator is not a regular offshore wind farm.
Labour, the Greens and former revenue minister Peter Dunne joined information technology industry lobby groups in 2013 in raising concern that Kiwi technology companies had been deliberately left out of a tender to help design Phase I of Inland Revenue's business transformation scheme and to "validate" its future phases.
Recent press exposes of abuses of the Abortion Act and the Liverpool Care Pathway could have been prevented by lobby groups arguing that discussing abortion in a negative way might damage women's equality; or from lobby groups arguing that negative reporting of the LCP might affect patients' rights to choose end-of-life care.
Professor Nano Ruzin comments for Utrinski Vesnik that Macedonia's political and business-elite has no greater sense and knowledge on the meaning of lobby groups.
Monterona added that the 48 OFWs also asked their families and relatives in the Philippines to form their own lobby groups to help the campaign for their release and repatriation.
As over 15000 politicians and delegates gather in Copenhagen for the UN's Climate Change conference, a separate conference in Denmark also occurred, comprising of scientists and lobby groups.
With the exception of the summary conclusion, the remaining chapters address groups in the policy process, looking at ethnic group influence in foreign policy making, the shifting fortunes of the Japanese and China lobby groups, interest group participation in the Supreme Court nomination process, interest groups and the making of nanotechnology policy, the influence of the K-Street lobby groups during the Republican era, and other topics.
Has Birmingham slipped so far into the safety of polite rhetoric that business lobby groups never assume the role of protagonist and, when merited, very publicly?