local anesthetic

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local anesthetic

n.
An anesthetic drug that induces local anesthesia by inhibiting nerve excitation or conduction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.local anesthetic - anesthetic that numbs a particular area of the bodylocal anesthetic - anesthetic that numbs a particular area of the body
anaesthetic, anaesthetic agent, anesthetic, anesthetic agent - a drug that causes temporary loss of bodily sensations
anesthyl - a mixture of methyl and ethyl chloride; sprayed on as a local anesthetic
antipruritic - a substance that relieves or prevents itching
benzocaine, ethyl aminobenzoate - a white crystalline ester used as a local anesthetic
butacaine, butacaine sulfate - a white crystalline ester that is applied to mucous membranes as a local anesthetic
ethyl chloride - a colorless flammable gas used as a local surface anesthetic
Lidocaine, Xylocaine - a local anesthetic (trade names Lidocaine and Xylocaine) used topically on the skin and mucous membranes
Ethocaine, procaine - a white crystalline powder (trade name Ethocaine) administered near nerves as a local anesthetic in dentistry and medicine
tetracaine - a crystalline compound used in the form of a hydrochloride as a local anesthetic
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding allergic reactions to local anesthetics. Ann Pharmacother.
With its short-acting profile in infiltration anesthesia, prilocaine is one of the most commonly used amide-type local anesthetics. Allergic reactions, such as edema, urticaria, dermatitis, and pallor are among the predominant side effects from low-dose prilocaine infiltration (1).
Comparative assessment of the effects of three local anesthetics: lidocaine, prilocaine, and mepivacaine on blood pressure changes in patients with controlled hypertension.
The only significant (p 0.05) in healthy and diabetic patients who had taken their hypoglycemic medications undergone tooth extraction with adrenaline containing local anesthetics, however significant changes (p 250 mg/dl and patients with any other systemic disease like cardiovascular disease, hepatic disease, renal disease and neurological diseases were excluded from the study.
Local anesthetics enable surgical procedures to be performed without requiring general anesthesia, but can result in a number of complications related both to the patient being awake and to administration errors.
Prior information notice without call for competition: Provision of Local anesthetics.
Continuous epidural infusions (CEI) of local anesthetics with patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) is the most popular method of maintaining epidural labor analgesia in the United States (1).
To date, no studies examining the efficacy of local anesthetics in post-tonsillectomy pain control have used a paired design to account for the variability in pain difference between individuals.
The book does not address basic techniques for the delivery of local anesthetics. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
Although ultrasound guidance indisputably leads to fewer needle passes for single-injection blocks, it seems to encourage small readjustment of needle tip position and multiple injections of local anesthetics [8, 9].
Exclusion criteria included age younger than 18 years, inability to communicate with the investigators or hospital staff, preexisting valgus deformity, flexion contracture or history of allergic reaction to amide local anesthetics, or patient refusal.
Dionne, "Long-acting local anesthetics and perioperative pain management," Dental Clinics of North America, vol.

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