extirpation

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Related to Local extinction: Mass extinction, extirpated

ex·tir·pate

 (ĕk′stər-pāt′)
tr.v. ex·tir·pat·ed, ex·tir·pat·ing, ex·tir·pates
1.
a. To destroy totally; kill off: an effort to reintroduce wildlife that had been extirpated from the region.
b. To render absent or nonexistent: "No society ... is devoid of ... religion, even those ... which have made deliberate attempts to extirpate it" (Roy A. Rappaport). See Synonyms at eliminate.
2. To pull up by the roots.
3. To remove by surgery.

[Latin exstirpāre, exstirpāt- : ex-, ex- + stirps, root.]

ex′tir·pa′tion n.
ex′tir·pa′tive adj.
ex′tir·pa′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

extirpation

1. the process of extirpating or destroying totally, as by tearing up the roots.
2. the condition of being totally destroyed.
See also: Processes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extirpation - surgical removal of a body part or tissueextirpation - surgical removal of a body part or tissue
adenoidectomy - surgical removal of the adenoids; commonly performed along with tonsillectomy
adrenalectomy, suprarenalectomy - surgical removal of one or both adrenal glands
appendectomy, appendicectomy - surgical removal of the vermiform appendix
cholecystectomy - surgical removal of the gall bladder (usually for relief of gallstone pain)
clitoridectomy, female circumcision - excision of the clitoris
surgical operation, surgical procedure, surgical process, surgery, operation - a medical procedure involving an incision with instruments; performed to repair damage or arrest disease in a living body; "they will schedule the operation as soon as an operating room is available"; "he died while undergoing surgery"
embolectomy - surgical removal of an embolus (usually from an artery)
endarterectomy - surgical removal of the inner lining of an artery that is clogged with atherosclerosis
enervation - surgical removal of a nerve
hypophysectomy - surgical removal of the pituitary gland
hysterectomy - surgical removal of the uterus
laminectomy - surgical removal of the bony arches on one or more vertebrae
laryngectomy - surgical removal of part or all of the larynx (usually to treat cancer of the larynx)
lithotomy - surgical removal of a stone (calculus)
lobectomy - surgical removal of a lobe from any organ of the body (as the lung or brain)
lumpectomy - surgical removal of a tumor without removing much of the surrounding tissue or lymph nodes; performed in some cases of breast cancer
mastectomy - surgical removal of a breast to remove a malignant tumor
mastoidectomy - surgical removal of some or all of the mastoid process
meniscectomy - surgical removal of the meniscus of the knee
nephrectomy - surgical removal of a kidney
neurectomy - surgical removal of all or part of a nerve
oophorectomy, ovariectomy - surgical removal of one of both ovaries
oophorosalpingectomy - surgical removal of one or both ovaries and the corresponding Fallopian tubes
ophthalmectomy - surgical removal of an eye
orchidectomy - surgical removal of one or both testicles
pancreatectomy - surgical removal of part or all of the pancreas
pneumonectomy - surgical removal of a lung (usually to treat lung cancer)
prostatectomy - surgical removal of part or all of the prostate gland
salpingectomy - surgical removal of one or both Fallopian tubes
septectomy - surgical removal of all or part of a septum (especially the nasal septum or atrial septum)
sigmoidectomy - surgical removal of part or all of the sigmoid colon (usually to remove a malignant tumor)
splenectomy - surgical removal of the spleen
stapedectomy - surgical removal of the stapes of the middle ear
sympathectomy - surgical interruption of a nerve pathway in the sympathetic nervous system
thrombectomy - surgical removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel
thyroidectomy - surgical removal of the thyroid gland
tonsillectomy - surgical removal of the palatine tonsils; commonly performed along with adenoidectomy
vasectomy - surgical procedure that removes all or part of the vas deferens (usually as a means of sterilization); is sometimes reversible
vulvectomy - surgical removal of part or all of the vulva
2.extirpation - the act of pulling up or out; uprooting; cutting off from existence
pull, pulling - the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"; "his strenuous pulling strained his back"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

extirpation

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

extirpation

[ˌekstəˈpeɪʃən] Nextirpación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

extirpation

n (lit, fig)Ausrottung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ex·tir·pa·tion

n. extirpación, ablación de una parte u órgano.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Co-Author Morten Tange Olsen is a marine biologist from the University of Copenhagen's GLOBE Institute: 'This is one of the earliest examples of local extinction of a marine resource following human arrival and overexploitation.
Large colonies previously at home in the boggy mosses of Manchester and Liverpool have long since been lost to local extinction as the UK has built its agriculture over the last two centuries.
Its wild populations, already hemmed in by habitat destruction because of an exploding human population, are also being shot, snared and live-captured so efficiently that national parks and other natural areas are now mostly afflicted with "empty forest syndrome": suitable forest habitat from which even small animals and birds have been hunted into local extinction. Other Asian countries are in various stages of the same convulsion.
"In the wild, Patagonian maras are threatened by hunting and habitat loss and in some regions these threats have resulted in the local extinction of the species."
CWEL in its petition has alleged that the Supreme Court in 2009 had directed construction of Chilla Motichur corridor but the callous attitudes of NHAI date construction had not been completed till date resulting in local extinction of tigers in the park.
"It's time Michael Gove stops playing the badger blame game to appease the farming lobby, before we see this protected species driven to local extinction in parts of the country where it has lived since the Ice Age."
Population specialists are worried that if this low birthrate trend continues, by 2030 over half of the village will be composed of individuals over 65 which could lead to "local extinction," a term used by Hiroya Masuda to describe a similar phenomenon in Japan.
If global temperatures increase by 4.5 degree Celsius, 13 percent of migratory birds are at risk of local extinction, compared to 74 percent of amphibians, which are unable to move as far.
Figures from a new report out today by The Wildlife Trusts (TWT) reveal the UK has seen a 30% decline in the number of water voles, yet in Wales the work of Gwent Wildlife Trust (GWT) has seen the creatures brought back from local extinction.
When invasive plants like autumn olive, buckthorn, barberry, bush honeysuckle, or Phragmites invade a plant community, they replace the local native species at that site, potentially causing complete local extinction or a decline in plants that contribute to ecosystem function.
Climate change is now second on the list of threats, after invasive non-native species, which can force native species to local extinction and upset the ecological balance of an area.

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