folklore

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folk·lore

 (fōk′lôr′)
n.
1. The traditional beliefs, myths, tales, and practices of a people, transmitted orally.
2. The comparative study of folk knowledge and culture. Also called folkloristics.
3.
a. A body of widely accepted but usually spurious notions about a place, group, or institution: Rumors of their antics became part of the folklore of Hollywood.
b. A popular but unfounded belief.

folk′lor′ic adj.
folk′lor′ish adj.
folk′lor′ist n.
folk′lor·is′tic adj.

folklore

(ˈfəʊkˌlɔː)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the unwritten literature of a people as expressed in folk tales, proverbs, riddles, songs, etc
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the body of stories and legends attached to a particular place, group, activity, etc: Hollywood folklore; rugby folklore.
3. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the anthropological discipline concerned with the study of folkloric materials
ˈfolkˌloric adj
ˈfolkˌlorist n, adj
ˌfolklorˈistic adj

folk•lore

(ˈfoʊkˌlɔr, -ˌloʊr)

n.
1. the traditional beliefs, legends, customs, etc., of a people; lore of a people.
2. the study of such lore.
3. a body of widely held but false or unsubstantiated beliefs.
[1846; coined by English antiquary William John Thoms (1803–85)]
folk′lor`ic, adj.
folk′lor`ist, n.
folk`lor•is′tic, adj.

folklore

the study of the traditions of a particular people in custom, song, story, belief, etc. — folklorist, n.
See also: Mankind

folklore

The traditional beliefs, legends, or stories passed by word of mouth within a society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culturefolklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
lycanthropy - (folklore) the magical ability of a person to assume the characteristics of a wolf
lore, traditional knowledge - knowledge gained through tradition or anecdote; "early peoples passed on plant and animal lore through legend"
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
ogre - (folklore) a giant who likes to eat human beings
troll - (Scandanavian folklore) a supernatural creature (either a dwarf or a giant) that is supposed to live in caves or in the mountains
elf, gremlin, imp, pixie, pixy, hob, brownie - (folklore) fairies that are somewhat mischievous
dibbuk, dybbuk - (Jewish folklore) a demon that enters the body of a living person and controls that body's behavior
goblin, hob, hobgoblin - (folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature that makes trouble for human beings
kelpie, kelpy - (Scottish folklore) water spirit in the form of a horse that likes to drown its riders
lamia, vampire - (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the living
banshee, banshie - (Irish folklore) a female spirit who wails to warn of impending death
Oberson - (Middle Ages) the king of the fairies and husband of Titania in medieval folklore
Titania - (Middle Ages) the queen of the fairies in medieval folklore
peri - (Persian folklore) a supernatural being descended from fallen angels and excluded from paradise until penance is done
golem - (Jewish folklore) an artificially created human being that is given life by supernatural means

folklore

noun
A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
Translations
عادات الشَّعْب وَتقاليدُه، فولكلورفُولكلور
folklór
folklorefolkeminder
kansanperinne
folklor
folklór
òjóîfræîi
民間伝承
전설
folklór
folkloristik
เรื่องราวประเพณีและความเชื่อของผู้คน
văn hóa dân gian

folklore

[ˈfəʊklɔːʳ] Nfolklore m

folklore

[ˈfəʊklɔːr] nfolklore mfolk medicine nmédecine f traditionnellefolk music n (traditional)musique f folklorique; (contemporary)musique f folkfolk singer n (traditional)chanteur/euse m/f de chansons folkloriques; (contemporary)chanteur/euse m/f folk invfolk song folksong [ˈfəʊksɒŋ] n (traditional)chanson f folklorique; (contemporary)chanson f folk inv

folklore

[ˈfəʊkˌlɔːʳ] nfolclore m

folk

(fouk) noun plural
(especially American folks) people. The folk in this town are very friendly.
adjective
(of the traditions) of the common people of a country. folk customs; folk dance; folk music.
folks noun plural
one's family. My folks all live nearby.
ˈfolklore noun
the study of the customs, beliefs, stories, traditions etc of a particular people. the folklore of the American Indians.

folklore

فُولكلور folklór folklore Folklore λαϊκή παράδοση folclor, folclore kansanperinne folklore folklor folclore 民間伝承 전설 folklore folklore folklor folclore фольклор folkloristik เรื่องราวประเพณีและความเชื่อของผู้คน folklor văn hóa dân gian 民间传说
References in periodicals archive ?
Local folklore has it that Betty Ashworth, who the 220-year-old pub is named after, can still be heard walking the corridors and keeping an eye on the staff.
Marcos Sports Stadium in Laoag City on Friday night, will include performances depicting communal faith and religious festivals, the province's colonization and subsequent revolts, traditions like courtship and local folklore, which shaped the Ilokano.
Local folklore leads us to a satisfyingly dark psychological destination.
Fellow Airdrie Academy S2 pupils Eilidh Currie, Eilidh McDermid and RachelThom were selected as runners-up for their use of the language, ranging from a poem on the Glasgow pipe band championships to a tale of local folklore.
Taking inspiration from Norse mythology and local folklore, a theatrical bonfire resembling a giant beast's lair will form the centrepiece to the evening's theatrics before culminating in a firework finale.
She uses her time to work on her dissertation, and Carl becomes interested in local folklore and customs, including the fact that in earlier times, coffins for the townspeople were built in the shape of boats.
Chandio drew a comparison between Molana Rumi and Bhitai, saying Rumi had confined his poetry into divine lines whereas Bhitai narrated contemporary local folklore and made them immortal.
Her Coptic upbringing, local folklore, and rural life were the main inspirations for Nakhla (1908-1977).
Even since then, their then home has gone down in local folklore as the haunted house of Aunt Annie.
This followed decades of local folklore that a train, loaded with gold, had vanished after leaving Wroclaw in early 1945.
The latest and third edition consists of 148 questionnaires, including happiness evaluated with 10 grades, economic situation, health condition, education, and also questions related to traditional culture and lifestyle such as number of visits to a temple and awareness of local folklore.
According to local folklore, the train entered a tunnel in 1945 and never emerged.