Locarno Pact

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Locarno Pact

(ləʊˈkɑːnəʊ)
n
(Historical Terms) a series of treaties, concluded in Locarno, Switzerland in 1925, between Germany, France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Italy, Poland, and Czechoslovakia. The principal treaty, between Germany, France, and Belgium, concerned the maintenance of their existing frontiers, settlement of disputes by arbitration without resort to force, and the demilitarization of the Rhineland. This treaty was guaranteed by the United Kingdom and Italy but was violated when Germany occupied the Rhineland in 1936. Also called: Treaties of Locarno
References in periodicals archive ?
Eldest son Joseph Austen Chamberlain went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to secure the signatures of world leaders over the Locarno treaties and was Chancellor from 1903 to 1905.
and writing and history, Central European U.) examines Britain's relations with Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland from the onset of the new European system to the conclusion of the Locarno treaties. He treats each country separately, and divides diplomatic from financial relations.
And Coolidge's administration did not lack for achievements in the foreign-policy area (at least as viewed by contemporaries), considering the Kellogg-Briand Pact, the Locarno Treaties in Europe, and the settlement with Mexico.