John Locke

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Noun1.John Locke - English empiricist philosopher who believed that all knowledge is derived from sensory experience (1632-1704)John Locke - English empiricist philosopher who believed that all knowledge is derived from sensory experience (1632-1704)
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That means, for example, that the "secessionism" of the Confederates was a necessary consequence of Lockeanism.
Thomas Paine would become famous peddling Hobbesianism and Lockeanism for the people.
If he did not predict that a secularized Lockeanism could itself disrupt the constitutional balance that relied on a certain Christian understanding of self-government, he nevertheless defended that balance against the enemies of his time.
14) If Professor Barnett wants to reinvigorate a libertarian Lockeanism, he will have to do it himself, confronting the formidable objections that have deterred many thoughtful philosophers from this project.
But the American Founding--indeed the Declaration itself--is a more capacious phenomenon than Lockeanism can explain.
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) explained years later that the document's Lockeanism "was intended to be an expression of the American mind, and to give to that expression the proper tone and spirit called for by the occasion" (1944, 719).
He, therefore, surveys a broad range of contemporary intellectual positions while constantly highlighting the theoretical and practical incoherence of that strange mix or hybrid of Lockeanism and Darwinism that underlies the modern affirmation of human beings as beings who are radically indistinguishable from other animals and yet capable of subduing or conquering nature, including their own.
And since, Feser implies, the medieval approach to natural law is the right one, the contemporary Lockean faces a dilemma: either espouse Lockeanism without foundations, or reject Lockeanism for Scholasticism.