Locofoco


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locofoco

(ˌləʊkəʊˈfəʊkəʊ)
n, pl -cos
a match for starting a fire

Lo•co•fo•co

(ˌloʊ koʊˈfoʊ koʊ)

n., pl. -cos.
1. a member of a radical faction of the New York City Democrats, organized in 1835.
2. (l.c.) a friction match or cigar developed in the 19th century, ignited by rubbing against any hard, dry surface.
[orig. “self-lighting”]
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References in classic literature ?
But now, should you go thither to seek him, you would inquire in vain for the Locofoco Surveyor.
38) Smith's son Archibald was elected to Cleveland City Council in 1836 as part of the same Locofoco city council faction as Hunters' Lodge organizers A.
In some ways, especially in terms of electoral organization, the 1870s antimonopolists and, say, the Greenbackers have more in common organizationally with the Liberty Party, the Free Soilers, and even the Locofoco movement than with the Populists and Progressives.
Even as the story "Second Thoughts Best" valorizes the metropolitan woman's knowledge of party politics, it represents shifting party allegiances as "unstable and accidental" and the fragmenting of Democrats into Locofoco and other factions as "petty wrangling" that separates lovers as well as men otherwise affiliated (342, 340).
Earle (169) "was hailed with enthusiasm by large sections of the Democratic, or Locofoco, Party.
James Ray and John Parr have started a locofoco paper in Maine called the Democrat.
The less numerous but more radical group, epitomized by Senator Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri and the Locofoco contingent of New York City Democrats, advocated a complete "divorce" of the national government from dealings with all banks in an effort to promote hard money.
Shona, the director of Glasgow design agency Locofoco, said: "Stevie Wonder's album Inner Visions was the most wonderful thing I'd ever heard.
Brownlow, A Political Register, Setting Forth the Principles of the Whig and Locofoco Parties in the United States, with the Life and Public Services of Henry Clay (Jonesborough, 1844),120, Jonesborough Whig, 8 July 1840; Nashville Whig, 30 August 1839.
was a tavern owner who advertised in the New Era and was also active in locofoco politics.
The President's support of the Independent Treasury plan further stoked the fires of an already raging national debate on the economy causing the disciples of finance capital to respond to the Locofoco critique with impassioned and lengthy defenses of their "credit system.
Sir, the Locofocos would utterly destroy this nation in five years, if they had their own way.