locus

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Related to Locus ceruleus: Raphe nuclei

lo·cus

 (lō′kəs)
n. pl. lo·ci (-sī′, -kē, -kī′)
1. A locality; a place.
2. A center or focus of great activity or intense concentration: "the cunning exploitation of loci of power; the insulation from normal American society" (Clifton Fadiman).
3. Mathematics The set or configuration of all points whose coordinates satisfy a single equation or one or more algebraic conditions.
4. The position that a given gene or genetic marker occupies on a chromosome.

[Latin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

locus

(ˈləʊkəs)
n, pl loci (ˈləʊsaɪ)
1. (Law) (in many legal phrases) a place or area, esp the place where something occurred
2. (Mathematics) maths a set of points whose location satisfies or is determined by one or more specified conditions: the locus of points equidistant from a given point is a circle.
3. (Genetics) genetics the position of a particular gene on a chromosome
[C18: Latin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lo•cus

(ˈloʊ kəs)

n., pl. -ci (-saɪ, -ki, -kaɪ)
1. a place; locality.
2. a center or source, as of activities or power: locus of control.
3. Math. the set of all points, lines, or surfaces that satisfy a given requirement.
4. the position of a gene on a chromosome.
[1525–35; < Latin; Old Latin stlocus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locus - the scene of any event or action (especially the place of a meeting)locus - the scene of any event or action (especially the place of a meeting)
scene - the place where some action occurs; "the police returned to the scene of the crime"
2.locus - the specific site of a particular gene on its chromosome
site, situation - physical position in relation to the surroundings; "the sites are determined by highly specific sequences of nucleotides"
3.locus - the set of all points or lines that satisfy or are determined by specific conditions; "the locus of points equidistant from a given point is a circle"
set - (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

locus

noun
1. The place where a person or thing is located:
2. A particular portion of space chosen for something:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

locus

[ˈləʊkəs] N (loci (pl)) → punto m, sitio m (Math) → lugar m (geométrico)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

locus

n pl <loci> → geometrischer Ort
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

locus

[ˈləʊkəs] n (loci (pl)) [ˈləʊsaɪ] (Math) → luogo geometrico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lo·cus

1. n. lugar, sitio;
2. localización de un gen en el cromosoma.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(28) (See "Changes in the locus ceruleus lead to withdrawal," (29) page 331.) Symptoms start 2 to 3 half-lives after the last dose of opioid.
Serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways originating from dorsal raphe and locus ceruleus terminate in frontal cortex for mood regulation; in limbic areas for emotional and anxiety regulation and in hypothalamus for appetite, weight and sleep regulation.
Aston-Jones, "Nucleus locus ceruleus: new evidence of anatomical and physiological specificity," Physiological Reviews, vol.
Specifically in the sympathetic nervous system, serotonin can inhibit the release of norepinephrine from the locus ceruleus. In this case, low serotonin could lead to uncontrolled sympathetic activity resulting in a chronic stress situation, leading to depletion of norepinephrine as well as serotonin, furthering depression.
Some have suggested that it results from an imbalance between the dopaminergic/cholinergic and dopaminergic/ serotonergic systems (4); others, that the cause is a mismatch between the core and the shell of the nucleus accumbens, due in part to overstimulation of the locus ceruleus. (5)
It produces sedation and anxiolysis by binding to [alpha]2 receptors in the locus ceruleus, which diminishes the release of norepinephrine and inhibits sympathetic activity, thus decreasing heart rate and blood pressure.
Es por ello plausible considerar que la depresion se relaciona con procesos neurobiologicos que son tambien responsables del deterioro cognoscitivo, tales como el deterioro del locus ceruleus y la sustancia negra (Heun et al., 2002, 2003), y el hipometabolismo (Caroli et al., 2010), de manera que la depresion puede llegar a considerarse como un sintoma inicial de los procesos degenerativos involucrados en la enfermedad de Alzheimer, mas que como una senal de malestar psicologico.
Tank, "Chronic nicotine treatment leads to induction of tyrosine hydroxylase in locus ceruleus neurons: the role of transcriptional activation," Molecular Pharmacology, vol.
In addition, loss of serotoninergic neurons in the median raphe and adrenergic neurons in the locus ceruleus lead to deficits in serotonin and norepinephrine, respectively.