locust

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locust
black locust
Robinia pseudoacacia

lo·cust

 (lō′kəst)
n.
1. Any of various short-horned grasshoppers that sometimes migrate in immense swarms, devouring vegetation and crops.
2. A cicada, especially a periodical cicada.
3.
a. Any of several trees of the pea family bearing long pods, especially the black locust, honey locust, and carob.
b. The wood of any of these trees.

[Middle English, from Old French locuste, from Latin locusta. Sense 3a, probably from the resemblance of a carob pod to a grasshopper and the use of both as subsistence food in drier regions of the Near East.]

locust

(ˈləʊkəst)
n
1. (Animals) any of numerous orthopterous insects of the genera Locusta, Melanoplus, etc, such as L. migratoria, of warm and tropical regions of the Old World, which travel in vast swarms, stripping large areas of vegetation. See also grasshopper1 Compare seventeen-year locust
2. (Plants) Also called: locust tree or false acacia a North American leguminous tree, Robinia pseudoacacia, having prickly branches, hanging clusters of white fragrant flowers, and reddish-brown seed pods
3. (Plants) the yellowish durable wood of this tree
4. (Plants) any of several similar trees, such as the honey locust and carob
[C13 (the insect): from Latin locusta locust; applied to the tree (C17) because the pods resemble locusts]
ˈlocust-ˌlike adj

lo•cust

(ˈloʊ kəst)

n.
1. Also called short-horned grasshopper. any of several grasshoppers of the family Acrididae, having short antennae and commonly migrating in swarms that strip the vegetation from large areas.
2. any of various cicadas, as the seventeen-year locust.
3. any North American tree of the genus Robinia, of the legume family, esp. R. pseudoacacia, having pinnate leaves and clusters of fragrant white flowers.
4. the durable wood of this tree.
5. any of various other trees, as the carob and the honey locust.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Latin locusta grasshopper]
lo′cust•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locust - migratory grasshoppers of warm regions having short antennaelocust - migratory grasshoppers of warm regions having short antennae
acridid, short-horned grasshopper - grasshopper with short antennae
Locusta migratoria, migratory locust - Old World locust that travels in vast swarms stripping large areas of vegetation
migratory grasshopper - serious pest of grain-growing and range areas of central and western United States
2.locust - hardwood from any of various locust trees
locust tree, locust - any of various hardwood trees of the family Leguminosae
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
3.locust - any of various hardwood trees of the family Leguminosaelocust - any of various hardwood trees of the family Leguminosae
Fabaceae, family Fabaceae, family Leguminosae, legume family, Leguminosae, pea family - a large family of trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs bearing bean pods; divided for convenience into the subfamilies Caesalpiniaceae; Mimosaceae; Papilionaceae
courbaril, Hymenaea courbaril - West Indian locust tree having pinnate leaves and panicles of large white or purplish flowers; yields very hard tough wood
locust - hardwood from any of various locust trees
Gleditsia aquatica, swamp locust, water locust - honey locust of swamps and bottomlands of southern United States having short oval pods; yields dark heavy wood
Gleditsia triacanthos, honey locust - tall usually spiny North American tree having small greenish-white flowers in drooping racemes followed by long twisting seed pods; yields very hard durable reddish-brown wood; introduced to temperate Old World
Robinia pseudoacacia, yellow locust, black locust - large thorny tree of eastern and central United States having pinnately compound leaves and drooping racemes of white flowers; widely naturalized in many varieties in temperate regions
clammy locust, Robinia viscosa - small rough-barked locust of southeastern United States having racemes of pink flowers and glutinous branches and seeds
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
Translations
جَرادَه، جَراد
kobylka
græshoppevandregræshoppe
kulkusirkka
sáska
engispretta
skėrys
sisenis
sprinkhaantreksprinkhaan
lăcustă
kobilica
gräshoppa
сарана

locust

[ˈləʊkəst]
A. N
1. (Zool) → langosta f
2. (Bot) → algarroba f
B. CPD locust tree N (= false acacia) → acacia f falsa; (= carob) → algarrobo m

locust

[ˈləʊkəst] nlocuste f, sauterelle f

locust

nHeuschrecke f

locust

[ˈləʊkəst] nlocusta, cavalletta

locust

(ˈləukəst) noun
a type of large insect of the grasshopper family, found in Africa and Asia, which moves in very large groups and destroys growing crops by eating them.
References in periodicals archive ?
By analyzing a locust swarm of data--some 1,478 genes from each of 144 kinds of insects and their relatives--a worldwide research team has reconstructed the tale of how insects took over the Earth.
On August 13, an immature locust swarm and immature and mature locust swarms were reported having settled in Al Azaz area North West of Tor Al Baha.
And poverty, squalor and want are stalking all over the land vengefully like a locust swarm.
locusts-madagascar-un-needs-41-million-end-plague-1153269) A locust swarm in Madagascar this week eerily coincides with Passover, when Jewish people celebrate the story of their escape from Egypt.
Butterflies hover on the undergrowth with the density of a locust swarm but when they fly en masse to another shrub they take their vivid colour with them.
While studying the effects of temperature on locust swarm migration, Uvarov (1935) reported two types of responses: a) an increase in swarm excitability when in contact with a warm soil surface and b) an increase in reflex actions, as expressed in terms of an increased jump length of individuals belonging to young swarms.
Did you know that a locust swarm can eat over 10,000 tons of vegetation per day?
Years in the making, the production deftly employs overhead views to present the vastness of a sprawling caribou herd, hyenas chasing down an impala or a locust swarm, before zooming in to show baboons gingerly walking upright through a stream or bizarre troglodytes residing in the lightless abyss of caves.
FARMERS in Gulao, China, have written urging the government to supply them with 20,000 sparrows and 200,000 frogs to fight a locust swarm without resorting to using environmentally-unfriendly pesticides.
And in Ethiopia, the Addis Tribune warned of a locust swarm on the way.
The resulting movie, written and directed in great leisurely detail by Caroline Link (``Beyond Silence''), contains most of the elements that mark this subgenre: initial, unhappy white disorientation; wise and helpful natives; gorgeous rugged scenery; even a locust swarm.
The phrase "over the top" does not even begin to describe the performances of Martin Short and Miranda Richardson, who were apparently instructed to devour more scenery than a locust swarm (although even locusts have been known to leave a bit of foliage in their wake).