Turing test

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Turing test

n.
A test in which one or more judges, by conversing with an unseen interlocutor via text messages, attempt to determine whether the interlocutor is a human or a computer.

[After Alan Mathison Turing, who proposed such a test as a criterion for judging the sophistication of artificial intelligence.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Turing test

n
(Logic) a proposed test of a computer's ability to think, requiring that the covert substitution of the computer for one of the participants in a keyboard and screen dialogue should be undetectable by the remaining human participant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In his beautiful 2011 book The Most Human Human: What Talking to Computers Teaches Us About What It Means to Be Alive, Brian Christian shares his experience as a "human confederate" in a quirky contest known as the Loebner Prize. It's inspired by Alan Turing's proposal for how to gauge computer intelligence.
Albert One, Alice, and Elbot, chat bots of this era, won the Loebner Prize, an annual AI competition for the most human-like chat bots.
The Loebner Prize Competition (Christian 2011) is in particular associated with the development of chatterbots that are best viewed as successors to ELIZA (Weizenbaum 1966), the program that fooled people into thinking that they were talking to a human psychotherapist by cleverly turning a person's statements into questions of the sort a therapist would ask.
Zabaware is the maker of the award winning Ultra Hal software, artificial intelligence technology that won the “most human” computer of the year in the 17th annual Loebner Prize Competition for Artificial Intelligence (AI).
Nor have annual Turing tests, conducted under the auspices of the Loebner Prize, crowned a computer victor.
Annual competitions like the Loebner Prize competition demonstrate the continually increasing sophistication of computers.
His book's scaffolding, from which its many digressions are built, is his participation in the annual Loebner Prize, a contest in which one group of humans ("judges") engages in a battery of instant message conversations.
According to David Levy, winner of the 2009 Loebner Prize for artificial intelligence, humans will be marrying robots within 50 years, reports The Washington Times.
Robots Unlimited: Life In A Virtual Age by David Levy (leader of the winning team of the Loebner Prize Competition in 1997) is a highly researched and historically impressive documentation devoted to the past fifty years of research and development in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.