logarithm

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Related to Logarithim: natural logarithm

log·a·rithm

 (lô′gə-rĭth′əm, lŏg′ə-)
n. Mathematics
The power to which a base, such as 10, must be raised to produce a given number. If nx = a, the logarithm of a, with n as the base, is x; symbolically, logn a = x. For example, 103 = 1,000; therefore, log10 1,000 = 3. The kinds most often used are the common logarithm (base 10), the natural logarithm (base e), and the binary logarithm (base 2).

[New Latin logarithmus : Greek logos, reason, proportion; see leg- in Indo-European roots + Greek arithmos, number; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

log′a·rith′mic (-rĭth′mĭk), log′a·rith′mi·cal (-mĭ-kəl) adj.
log′a·rith′mi·cal·ly adv.

logarithm

(ˈlɒɡəˌrɪðəm)
n
(Mathematics) the exponent indicating the power to which a fixed number, the base, must be raised to obtain a given number or variable. It is used esp to simplify multiplication and division: if ax = M, then the logarithm of M to the base a (written logaM) is x. Often shortened to: log See also common logarithm, natural logarithm
[C17: from New Latin logarithmus, coined 1614 by John Napier, from Greek logos ratio, reckoning + arithmos number]

log•a•rithm

(ˈlɔ gəˌrɪð əm, -ˌrɪθ-, ˈlɒg ə-)

n.
the exponent of the power to which a base number must be raised to equal a given number; log: 2 is the logarithm of 100 to the base 10 (2 = log10 100).
[1605–15; < New Latin logarithmus < Greek log- log- + arithmós number; see arithmetic]

log·a·rithm

(lô′gə-rĭth′əm)
The power to which a base must be raised to produce a given number. For example, if the base is 10, then 3 is the logarithm of 1,000 (written log 1,000 = 3) because 103 = 1,000.

logarithm

- From Greek logos, "reckoning, ratio," and arithmos, "number."
See also related terms for reckoning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.logarithm - the exponent required to produce a given numberlogarithm - the exponent required to produce a given number
exponent, index, power - a mathematical notation indicating the number of times a quantity is multiplied by itself
common logarithm - a logarithm to the base 10
Napierian logarithm, natural logarithm - a logarithm to the base e
Translations
لوغاريثْم
logaritmus
logaritme
logaritmi
logaritam
logaritmus
lógaritmi
logaritmas
logaritms
logaritmus
logaritm
ลอการิทึม

logarithm

[ˈlɒgərɪθəm] Nlogaritmo m

logarithm

[ˈlɒgərɪðəm] nlogarithme mlog book n
(formerly) (= registration document) [car] → carte grise
[traveller, explorer] → carnet m de route; [lorry driver] → carnet m de route
[movement of goods] → registre mlog cabin ncabane f en rondinslog fire nfeu m de bois

logarithm

nLogarithmus m

logarithm

[ˈlɒgəˌrɪðm] nlogaritmo
common logarithm → logaritmo decimale or volgare

logarithm

(ˈlogəriðəm) noun
(abbreviated to log (log) ) the number of times eg 10 must be multiplied by itself to produce a particular number. 10  10  10 or 103 = 1,000, so 3 is here the logarithm of 1,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
Logistic model for outfielders Variable Odds Ratio 9S% CI (1) Putouts 1.011 (1.008, 1.014) Fielding percentage 1.746 (1.366, 2.231) Age Younger than 27 (2) 1.000 -- Each year past 27 0.695 (0.611, 0.791) Not yet won a Gold Glove 0.113 (0.068, 0.190) Number of previous Gold Gloves won 2.016 (1.698, 2.393) All-Star appearances Appearance in current reason 4.408 (2.667, 7.286) Total appearances 0.718 (0.629, 0.820) Post-season appearance 1.459 (0.945, 2.253) Runs Fewer than 26 1.000 -- Each past 26 1.022 (1.010, 1.034) Natural Logarithim of Runs Batted In 2.915 (1.527, 5.564) Calendar year (3) 0.971 (0.953, 0.989) (1) 95% Confidence Interval (2) Odds ratio of 1.000 and no confidence interval denotes the reference group (3) Years since 1965 Table 10.
We use the logarithim of confidence in the US as this equation had a marginally lower standard error than an equation in which the level of confidence was used, although the difference was only marginal.