fallacy

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fal·la·cy

 (făl′ə-sē)
n. pl. fal·la·cies
1. A false notion.
2. A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid inference.
3. Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness.
4. The quality of being deceptive.

[Alteration of Middle English fallace, from Old French, from Latin fallācia, deceit, from fallāx, fallāc-, deceitful, from fallere, to deceive.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fallacy

(ˈfæləsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. an incorrect or misleading notion or opinion based on inaccurate facts or invalid reasoning
2. unsound or invalid reasoning
3. the tendency to mislead
4. (Logic) logic an error in reasoning that renders an argument logically invalid
[C15: from Latin fallācia, from fallax deceitful, from fallere to deceive]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fal•la•cy

(ˈfæl ə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.; misconception.
2. a misleading or unsound argument.
3. erroneousness.
4. any of various types of erroneous reasoning that render arguments logically unsound.
5. Obs. deception.
[1350–1400; Middle English fallace < Middle French < Latin fallācia a trick, deceit]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fallacy - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
pseudoscience - an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions
misconception - an incorrect conception
logical fallacy - a fallacy in logical argumentation
pathetic fallacy - the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects; `the friendly sun' is an example of the pathetic fallacy
sophism, sophistry, sophistication - a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
paralogism - an unintentionally invalid argument
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fallacy

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

fallacy

noun
1. An erroneous or false idea:
2. Plausible but invalid reasoning:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مَظْهَر خادِع، مُغالَطَه
bludklamomyl
fejlslutningvildfarelse
téveszme
röng hugmynd, villa
klaidinga nuomonėklaidingas įsitikinimas
kļūdamaldi

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] N (= false belief) → falacia f; (= false reasoning) → sofisma m, argucia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fallacy

[ˈfæləsi] nidée f fausse
it is a fallacy that ... → il est faux de croire que ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fallacy

nIrrtum m; (in logic) → Fehlschluss m, → Trugschluss m; a popular fallacyein weitverbreiteter Irrtum
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] nerrore m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fallacy

(ˈfӕləsi) plural ˈfallacies noun
a wrong idea or belief, usually one that is generally believed to be true; false reasoning. That belief is just a fallacy.
fallacious (fəˈleiʃəs) adjective
wrong, mistaken or showing false reasoning. a fallacious argument.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
His ingenuity lied in his ability to demonstrate the logical fallacies in the theological writings of former Muslim scholars.
His topics include establishing a written dialogue with a text, classical and contemporary models of argument, errors in reasoning: logical fallacies, and integrating sources and avoiding plagiarism.
As usual there were plenty of ad homs and logical fallacies ("religious zealots", "high priests of denial", "scientific consensus") but also, not a grain of proof was offered.
Synopsis: Many serious leftists have learned to distrust talk of logic and logical fallacies, associated with right-wing "logicbros".
By examining the aforementioned accusations of violence and offence - which involved world-famous artists like Cradle of Filth, Ozzy Osbourne, and Marilyn Manson - students can engage in scientific thinking, exploring logical fallacies, research design issues, and thinking biases.
Therefore, to be ahead of them, militaries must ensure they have an adaptive mind-set that is realistic, open and unassuming, which no doubt requires the need to be aware of biases, logical fallacies, and assumptions.
Knowledge and education open our eyes to every candidate's self-serving use of deception, historical revisionism, logical fallacies, name recall, and guns, goons and gold.
Logical fallacies giving rise to the expression "a false analogy" include: The compared cases are not alike in their essential characteristics; the characteristics are not accurately described; or the proposed analogy is a figurative analogy, not a logical one.
Some of these are established logical fallacies, while others are worse: they appear to be aiming to break new ground in unclear thinking.
Such errors and flawed reasoning include cognitive biases and logical fallacies. Going with your gut - experienced as perceptions or feelings, generally leads the thinker to favour perspectives consistent with their own personal biases and experiences.
Darwish praised the great interaction of the participants and their enthusiasm and eagerness to learn new skills during practical exercises on the common logical fallacies and cognitive biases, adding that a proposal was made to the participants to carry out awareness activities in different areas to benefit from information and use it during the debate.
They directly engage with the protesters: asking them questions to expose logical fallacies, gleefully shouting back at their violent language, invoking their improvisation skills and natural wit to make jokes out of the situation.