model theory

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Related to Logical theory: Logical model, Ethical theory

model theory

n
(Logic) the branch of logic that deals with the properties of models; the semantic study of formal systems
ˈmodel-ˌtheoˈretic adj
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To me this sounded a lot like the securities industry's mantra of "there are no guarantees of sound financial advice," which in logical theory we call a Cystraw man' argument.
Currently, NorMas is only a promising logical theory, but it is time to see how it behaves on real data, in order to make it suitable for commercial applications.
According to some intellectual historians, Studies in Logical Theory (1903) signals a crucial turning point between Dewey's pre-turn-of-the-century neo-Hegelian logic of absolutes and his post-turn-of-the-century instrumental logic of experimental naturalism.
Contemporary readings in logical theory. Copi IM, Gould JA, eds.
"The logical theory is that the transportation agency was using it to spy on its own employees," Chris Soghoian, a former Federal Trade Commission technology expert told (http://uk.reuters.com/article/2013/01/04/us-turkey-web-interception-idUKBRE90301120130104) Reuters .
Police in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said it was too early to say the attack was racist but added: "It's a logical theory."
Drawing on the seminal research of Nicholas Rescher (1977), I have developed the view that basic principles of argumentation theory should not be understood as derived from a deductive logical theory, but are simply rules of thumb that have demonstrated pragmatic value over time (Rowland, 1995).
Formal fallacies being invalid patterns of argumentation proscribed by logical theory, he purports to show that they can, nonetheless, yield valid arguments.
Oxaal declares at the outset of this book, "I am attempting to explain the historical background of this curiously hybrid work (the Tractatus) that is, its logical theory with religious mysticism." One must say that he has been largely successful.--Jude P.
Peirce's theory of names does not take reference as the key operative notion in his theory of the meaning of names, and is meant to be a logical theory of the interpretation of quantifiers in different logics.
Whether there is, today, a logical theory that can claim full metaphysical neutrality is an open and controversial question.
The logical theory breaks with many of the basic presumptions of aleatoric probability theory, The fullest account has been provided by John Maynard Keynes where he defines probability as a logical relation between propositions.