logophile


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log·o·phile

 (lŏg′ə-fīl′)
n.
One who appreciates and enjoys words.

logophile

(ˈlɒɡəˌfaɪl)
n
a person who loves words

log•o•phile

(ˈlɔ gəˌfaɪl, ˈlɒg ə-)

n.
a lover of words.
[1955–60]

logophile

a lover of words. Also called philologue, philologer.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
If you're a logophile or simply love your weekly dose of Scrabble, you need The Allusionist in your life.
Here are the eyewitness statements Captain Ramsey sent to Ace Logophile Detective Katz.
An unashamed and enthusiastic logophile, the author peppers the text with witty postmodern word play.
Sterritt surmises, "Hitchcock inaugurated his sound-film career by worrying aloud that dialogue might displace 'the technique of the pure motion picture/ and despite the importance of carefully crafted screenplays to his oeuvre he remained a scopophile rather than logophile ...
THE EAST TENNESSEE POET GEORGE ADDISON SCARBROUGH, INVETERATE logophile and philologue, had a habit, as his biographer Randy Mackin recounts in his recent study George Scarbrough, Appalachian Poet, of "flipping through the pages of his beloved dictionary--an ancient edition about a foot thick and clumsy as a sack of grain--searching for the morning's new word" (1).
Jake was created by Sheree Fitch, a logophile (lover of words) and the author of books for adults, a well-received novel for middle readers (The Gravesavers) and many books of beloved "lip-slippery" poetry (If You Could Wear My Sneakers).
As a logophile (a lover of words), my first move upon learning of this month's "Message from the Editors" topic was to consider the word in question.
As rain tatters a west window, I'm lost in the kind of discovery that I'd feel guilty pursuing when not on vacation: flipping through almanacs such as Stephen Glazier's 977-page "Word Menu,"a steal at $7- part dictionary, part glossary and part logophile's delight.
Morpheus sees himself as a logophile: "Lover of words and lecher of words, licking my tongue into the dark crannies of syllables, lapping up secret juices, rooting with my swine-snout in the warm moist furrows, guzzling and snorting, licking my chops" (42).
Then there's the breed of logophile who enjoys trying to turn the brier patch of pronoun cases, subject-verb agreement, sequence of tenses, and the indicative and subjunctive moods into a manageable garden of delight.
And "information superhighway" can't evolve too soon or the professed logophile. "I'm tired of hearing it," he says.
As for me, a lifelong punster and logophile, I can not resist the temptation to play around with the way PGP's sound when read aloud.