logothete

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logothete

(ˈlɒɡəʊˌθiːt)
n
(Historical Terms) (in the Byzantine Empire and later in Sicily) a chancellor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Thus, Smirnova has found that an exapostilarion (22) of the service for the Finding of the Relics of St Makarios of Kalyazin was based on an exapostilarion to Varlaam of Khutyn, (23) which, in turn, was created by Pachomius Logothetes (24) from two exapostilarions--to St Sava (25) and to Simeon (26) the Serbian.
It was rather carefully assembled by royal ministers from the work of artists, craftsmen, and scholars brought from outside the island--mosaicists from Constantinople; carpenters and painters from Fatimid Cairo; ecclesiastical architects, masons and stone-carvers from Campania and Apulia, southern France and the Anglo-Norman world; palace architects and masons from Egypt and North Africa; silk-weavers kidnapped from Corinth and Thebes; Latin notaries from Rome, Montecassino and northwest Europe; Greek logothetes and scribes trained in the monastic scriptoriums of eastern Sicily and Calabria; Arabic secretaries from Cairo and al-Mahdiya; and many more besides.
--Thus, Williams tells Lewis that his primary meaning for 'Islam' is to equate it with Deism; that is, the idea dominant during the 18th-century Enlightenment that our world was made by a remote creator-god who has entirely withdrawn and plays no part in our daily world (as opposed to The Emperor in Byzantium, who in Williams's myth is God Himself, sending out 'logothetes' [administrators] and 'nuntii' [envoys] who are not just messengers but literal angels).