Lollardism


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Lollardism

1. the religious teachings of John Wycliffe, 14th-century English theologian, religious reformer, and Bible translator.
2. adherence to these teachings, especially in England and Scotland in the 14th and 15th centuries. Also called Lollardry, Lollardy, Wycliffism. — Lollard, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
References in classic literature ?
In England Luther's action revived the spirit of Lollardism, which had nearly been crushed out, and in spite of a minority devoted to the older system, the nation as a whole began to move rapidly toward change.
A convention of that history is that itinerant teams of poor preachers took Wyclif's ideas to the people and that by these means the popular heresy of Lollardism was born.
She examines association with an essential facet of Lollardism, namely scripture in the vernacular, sources and analogues, and tropes such as the role of the clergy, Lollardism in politics, and the use of oaths.
His critical focus, however, centers on the "terrifying restrictions" that he believes were imposed in England after 1409, the date when Archbishop Arundel sought to address the inconveniences of Lollardism, which taught an early form of predestination while denying the authority of the Church and its teachings on the Eucharist.
Lollardism preached the dropping of enforced celibacy, the extension of religious poverty and the translation of the bible into English, but some preachers went too far extending their beliefs into free love, although Grace was not one of those.