Lombard


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Lom·bard

 (lŏm′bərd, -bärd′, lŭm′-)
n.
1. A member of a Germanic people that invaded northern Italy in the sixth century ad and established a kingdom in the Po River valley. Also called Langobard.
2.
a. A native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
b. Any of a group of Romance languages spoken in Lombardy and adjacent regions and closely related to Provençal, Romansh, Franco-Provençal, and French.
3. A banker or moneylender.

[Middle English Lumbarde, from Old French lombard, from Old Italian lombardo, from Medieval Latin lombardus, from Latin Langobardus, Longobardus; see del- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, from the prominence of Lombards in 13th-century banking.]

Lom·bar′dic (-bär′dĭk) adj.

Lombard

(ˈlɒmbəd; -bɑːd; ˈlʌm-)
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Lombardy
2. (Peoples) Also called: Langobard a member of an ancient Germanic people who settled in N Italy after 568 ad
adj
3. (Placename) of or relating to Lombardy or the Lombards
4. (Peoples) of or relating to Lombardy or the Lombards

Lombard

(ˈlɒmbəd; -bɑːd; ˈlʌm-)
n
(Biography) Peter. ?1100–?60, Italian theologian, noted for his Sententiarum libri quattuor

Lom•bard

(ˈlɒm bɑrd, -bərd, ˈlʌm-)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
2. a member of a Germanic people who occupied N Italy in a.d. 568.
3. a banker or moneylender.
adj.
4. Also, Lom•bar′di•an, Lom•bar′dic. of or pertaining to Lombardy or its inhabitants.

Lom•bard

(ˈlɒm bɑrd, -bərd, ˈlʌm-)

n.
Peter (Petrus Lombardus), c1100–64?, Italian theologian: bishop of Paris 1159–64?.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lombard - a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th centuryLombard - a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th century
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Translations
langobardilombardialombardialainen

Lombard

[ˈlɒmbɑːd]
A. ADJlombardo
B. Nlombardo/a m/f

Lombard

adjlombardisch
nLombarde m, → Lombardin f
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick and Sam took up their present abode in very good, old-fashioned, and comfortable quarters, to wit, the George and Vulture Tavern and Hotel, George Yard, Lombard Street.
This is the same which is called, according to locality, climate, and races, Lombard, Saxon, or Byzantine.
Now here is a Lombard bond and a letter; it is a premium for the man who writes a history of Suvorov's wars.
From ten in the morning till two, he sites in his office in Lombard Street, and the pulse of the city beats differently in his absence.
Bankers, Lombard Street), who had been making up to Miss Maria the last two seasons, actually asked Amelia to dance the cotillon, could you expect that the former young lady should be pleased?
Is it a wonder that we were a conquering race, that we were proud, that when the Magyar, the Lombard, the Avar, the Bulgar, or the Turk poured his thousands on our frontiers, we drove them back?
And on the morrow he retraced his steps and proceeded to tone down his impressions of the great Lombard artist.
All the rest of her person, her simplicity, the easy grace of her Lombard beauty, was so seductive that it was difficult for those who looked at her to give her pain.
Godfrey happened to be cashing a cheque at a banking-house in Lombard Street.
I was going through Lombard Street in the dusk of the evening, just by the end of Three King court, when on a sudden comes a fellow running by me as swift as lightning, and throws a bundle that was in his hand, just behind me, as I stood up against the corner of the house at the turning into the alley.
At last I saw a vacancy at Mawson & Williams's, the great stock-broking firm in Lombard Street.
At the stipulated hour next morning, Nicholas repaired to the lodgings of Miss Snevellicci, which were in a place called Lombard Street, at the house of a tailor.