Lombard

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Lom·bard

 (lŏm′bərd, -bärd′, lŭm′-)
n.
1. A member of a Germanic people that invaded northern Italy in the sixth century ad and established a kingdom in the Po River valley. Also called Langobard.
2.
a. A native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
b. Any of a group of Romance languages spoken in Lombardy and adjacent regions and closely related to Provençal, Romansh, Franco-Provençal, and French.
3. A banker or moneylender.

[Middle English Lumbarde, from Old French lombard, from Old Italian lombardo, from Medieval Latin lombardus, from Latin Langobardus, Longobardus; see del- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, from the prominence of Lombards in 13th-century banking.]

Lom·bar′dic (-bär′dĭk) adj.

Lombard

(ˈlɒmbəd; -bɑːd; ˈlʌm-)
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Lombardy
2. (Peoples) Also called: Langobard a member of an ancient Germanic people who settled in N Italy after 568 ad
adj
3. (Placename) of or relating to Lombardy or the Lombards
4. (Peoples) of or relating to Lombardy or the Lombards

Lombard

(ˈlɒmbəd; -bɑːd; ˈlʌm-)
n
(Biography) Peter. ?1100–?60, Italian theologian, noted for his Sententiarum libri quattuor

Lom•bard

(ˈlɒm bɑrd, -bərd, ˈlʌm-)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
2. a member of a Germanic people who occupied N Italy in a.d. 568.
3. a banker or moneylender.
adj.
4. Also, Lom•bar′di•an, Lom•bar′dic. of or pertaining to Lombardy or its inhabitants.

Lom•bard

(ˈlɒm bɑrd, -bərd, ˈlʌm-)

n.
Peter (Petrus Lombardus), c1100–64?, Italian theologian: bishop of Paris 1159–64?.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lombard - a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th centuryLombard - a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th century
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Translations
langobardilombardialombardialainen

Lombard

[ˈlɒmbɑːd]
A. ADJlombardo
B. Nlombardo/a m/f

Lombard

adjlombardisch
nLombarde m, → Lombardin f
References in classic literature ?
The lieutenant dismounted before a shop in the Rue des Lombards, at the sign of the Pilon d'Or.
The comte, on arriving at the Rue des Lombards, found the shop of the grocer in great confusion; but it was not the encumberment of a lucky sale, or that of an arrival of goods.
Comminges had arrested one of the ringleaders and had ordered him to be hanged near the cross of Du Trahoir; but in attempting to execute this command the soldiery were attacked in the market-place with stones and halberds; the delinquent had escaped to the Rue des Lombards and rushed into a house.
The boy with the ill-secured eyes took his place on the box by the driver, and the driver was directed to go to Lombard Street.