Lombardy


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Related to Lombardy: Lombardy poplar

Lom·bar·dy

 (lŏm′bər-dē, lŭm′-)
A region of northern Italy bordering on Switzerland. First inhabited by a Gallic people, it became the center of the kingdom of the Lombards in the sixth century ad and part of Charlemagne's empire in 774. The Lombard League of cities defeated Emperor Frederick I in 1176.

Lombardy

(ˈlɒmbədɪ; ˈlʌm-)
n
(Placename) a region of N central Italy, bordering on the Alps: dominated by prosperous lordships and city-states during the Middle Ages; later ruled by Spain and then by Austria before becoming part of Italy in 1859; intensively cultivated and in parts highly industrialized. Pop: 9 108 645 (2003 est). Area: 23 804 sq km (9284 sq miles). Italian name: Lombardia

Lom•bard•y

(ˈlɒm bər di, ˈlʌm-)

n.
a region and former kingdom in N Italy. 8,901,000; 9190 sq. mi. (23,800 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lombardy - a region of north central Italy bordering SwitzerlandLombardy - a region of north central Italy bordering Switzerland
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Cremona - a city in Lombardy on the Po River; noted for the manufacture of fine violins from the 16th to the 18th centuries
Milan, Milano - the capital of Lombardy in northern Italy; has been an international center of trade and industry since the Middle Ages
Translations

Lombardy

[ˈlɒmbədɪ]
A. NLombardía f
B. CPD Lombardy poplar Nchopo m lombardo

Lombardy

[ˈlɒmbərdi] nLombardie f

Lombardy

nLombardei f

Lombardy

[ˈlɒmbədɪ] nLombardia
References in classic literature ?
King Louis was brought into Italy by the ambition of the Venetians, who desired to obtain half the state of Lombardy by his intervention.
And if the partition which she made with the Venetians in Lombardy was justified by the excuse that by it she got a foothold in Italy, this other partition merited blame, for it had not the excuse of that necessity.
Which errors, had he lived, were not enough to injure him had he not made a sixth by taking away their dominions from the Venetians; because, had he not aggrandized the Church, nor brought Spain into Italy, it would have been very reasonable and necessary to humble them; but having first taken these steps, he ought never to have consented to their ruin, for they, being powerful, would always have kept off others from designs on Lombardy, to which the Venetians would never have consented except to become masters themselves there; also because the others would not wish to take Lombardy from France in order to give it to the Venetians, and to run counter to both they would not have had the courage.
There was a long row of them in the orchard, with a Lombardy poplar at either end, and a hedge of lilacs behind.
Why does the Lombardy poplar hold its branches straight up in the air like that, when all the other poplars hold theirs out or hang them down?
Strange children, who meant nothing to me, were playing in the Harlings' big yard when I passed; the mountain ash had been cut down, and only a sprouting stump was left of the tall Lombardy poplar that used to guard the gate.
Detached broken fossils of pre-adamite whales, fragments of their bones and skeletons, have within thirty years past, at various intervals, been found at the base of the Alps, in Lombardy, in France, in England, in Scotland, and in the States of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.
It had no park, but the pleasure-grounds were tolerably extensive; and like every other place of the same degree of importance, it had its open shrubbery, and closer wood walk, a road of smooth gravel winding round a plantation, led to the front, the lawn was dotted over with timber, the house itself was under the guardianship of the fir, the mountain-ash, and the acacia, and a thick screen of them altogether, interspersed with tall Lombardy poplars, shut out the offices.
air, liberty, melody of birds, plains of Lombardy, Venetian canals, Roman palaces, the Bay of Naples.
There is a big grove of fir trees behind it, two rows of Lombardy poplars down the lane, and a ring of white birches around a very delightful garden.
What mind, that is not wholly barbarous and uncultured, can find pleasure in reading of how a great tower full of knights sails away across the sea like a ship with a fair wind, and will be to-night in Lombardy and to-morrow morning in the land of Prester John of the Indies, or some other that Ptolemy never described nor Marco Polo saw?
In addition to this show of cultivation were two rows of young Lombardy poplars, a tree but lately introduced into America, formally lining either side of a pathway which led from a gate that opened on the principal street to the front door of the building.