longitude

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longitude

lon·gi·tude

 (lŏn′jĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′, lôn′-)
n.
1. Angular distance on the earth's surface, measured east or west from the Prime Meridian at Greenwich, England, to the meridian passing through a position, expressed in degrees (or hours), minutes, and seconds.
2. Celestial longitude.

[Middle English, length, a measured length, from Old French, from Latin longitūdō, longitūdin-, from longus, long; see del- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

longitude

(ˈlɒndʒɪˌtjuːd; ˈlɒŋɡ-)
n
1. (Physical Geography) distance in degrees east or west of the prime meridian at 0° measured by the angle between the plane of the prime meridian and that of the meridian through the point in question, or by the corresponding time difference. See latitude1
2. (Astronomy) astronomy short for celestial longitude
[C14: from Latin longitūdō length, from longus long1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lon•gi•tude

(ˈlɒn dʒɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. angular distance east or west on the earth's surface, as measured, usu. in degrees, from the meridian of some particular place to the prime meridian at Greenwich, England.
2. the angular distance of a celestial point from the great circle that is perpendicular to the ecliptic at the vernal equinox, measured through 360° eastward parallel to the ecliptic.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin longitūdō length. See longi-, -tude]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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longitude

lon·gi·tude

(lŏn′jĭ-to͞od′)
Distance east or west on the Earth's surface, measured in degrees from a certain meridian, usually the prime meridian at Greenwich, England, which has a longitude of 0°. The distance of a degree of longitude is about 69 statute miles (111 kilometers) or 60 nautical miles at the equator, narrowing to zero at the poles. Longitude and latitude are the coordinates used to identify any point on the Earth's surface. Compare latitude.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

longitude

Location east or west of the prime meridian.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.longitude - the angular distance between a point on any meridian and the prime meridian at Greenwich
angular distance - the angular separation between two objects as perceived by an observer; "he recorded angular distances between the stars"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
خَط الطّولخَطُّ الطُّولِ
délkazeměpisná délka
længdegradlængde
pituusaste
zemljopisna dužina
földrajzi hosszúság
lengd
経度
경도
ilgumailgumasišilginis
garums
longitud
เส้นแวง
kinh độ

longitude

[ˈlɒŋgɪtjuːd] Nlongitud f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

longitude

[ˈlɒndʒɪtjuːd] nlongitude f
250 degrees longitude → 250 degrés de longitude
at 250 degrees longitude → par 250 degrés de longitude
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

longitude

nLänge f; lines of longitudeLängengrade pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

longitude

[ˈlɒŋgɪtjuːd] nlongitudine f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

longitude

(ˈloŋgitjuːd) noun
the distance, measured in degrees on the map, that a place is east or west of a standard north-south line, usually that which passes through Greenwich. What is the latitude and longitude of that town?
ˌlongiˈtudinal adjective
ˌlongiˈtudinally adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

longitude

خَطُّ الطُّولِ zeměpisná délka længdegrad Länge γεωγραφικό μήκος longitud pituusaste longitude zemljopisna dužina longitudine 経度 경도 longitude lengdegrad długość geograficzna longitude долгота longitud เส้นแวง boylam kinh độ 经度
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, it took a clockmaker to create a practical solution to the longitude problem.
(3) In tracing the complex story of the people, machines and ideas involved in solving the longitude problem, portraits play an important role in 'Ships, Clocks & Stars'.
In Britain, King Charles II had founded the Royal Observatory in 1675 for the explicit purpose of addressing the longitude problem, but there had been no useful results nearly 40 years later.
"longitude problem" in 1759, no one and no thing could tell