longshore drift

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Related to Longshore currents: Tidal Currents, Rip currents

longshore drift

n
(Physical Geography) the process whereby beach material is gradually shifted laterally as a result of waves meeting the shore at an oblique angle
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On the East Coast, barrier islands usually move from north to south because longshore currents transport sand in the same direction.
From this study, the generation routes of longshore currents and strong rip currents were calculated and the flow direction and flow velocity measured by the plane-unit method in field observations showed very similar tendencies to those of 3D hydraulic model tests.
This draft is affected by sedimentation deposited by longshore currents. Nome is situated on a beach with prevailing winds running perpendicular to the shoreline.
"Structural currents form along piers where longshore currents and wave action flow."
Many phenomena are generated from the wave energy dissipation in the surf zone by breaking, but for a practical application, the generation of the longshore currents is the most significant, obtaining considerable strength and being a significant factor in controlling the morphology of the beaches.
This allowed an evaluation of the longshore currents. The results show that although the nearshore waves are not very much affected by the presence of the WD farm, the maximum current velocities may, however, have significant variations.
In the nearshore the pollution is usually spread along the coast due to the longshore currents. A simple, but very effective, model to estimate these currents, is SURF (Mettlach et al.
3 presents the ISSM estimations for the longshore currents along two lines corresponding to the time frame 2002/03/13/h00 when it is supposed that the oil spill is approaching the coast.
Waves and longshore currents have also played an important role for shaping the shoreline.
The monthly longshore sediment transport rates estimated based on the monthly observations on breaking wave height, surf zone width and the longshore currents are presented in the Tables 3 to 6.