looking-glass


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Related to looking-glass: looking-glass self

look′ing glass`


n.
1. a mirror.
2. the glass used in a mirror.
[1526]

look′ing-glass`


adj.
having the normal elements or circumstances reversed; topsy-turvy: a looking-glass world.
[alluding to the reversed world in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass (1871)]
Translations

looking-glass

(o.f.) [ˈlʊkɪŋglɑːs] N (frm) → espejo m

looking-glass

[ˈlukɪŋˌglɑːs] n (old) → specchio

look

(luk) verb
1. to turn the eyes in a certain direction so as to see, to find, to express etc. He looked out of the window; I've looked everywhere, but I can't find him; He looked at me (angrily).
2. to seem. It looks as if it's going to rain; She looks sad.
3. to face. The house looks west.
noun
1. the act of looking or seeing. Let me have a look!
2. a glance. a look of surprise.
3. appearance. The house had a look of neglect.
ˈlook-alike noun
a person who looks (exactly) like someone else; a double. the prince's look-alike.
-looking
having a certain appearance. good-looking; strange-looking.
looks noun plural
(attractive) appearance. She lost her looks as she grew older; good looks.
ˌlooker-ˈon noun
a person who is watching something happening; an onlooker.
ˈlooking-glass noun
a mirror.
ˈlookout noun
1. a careful watch. a sharp lookout; (also adjective) a lookout post.
2. a place from which such a watch can be kept.
3. a person who has been given the job of watching. There was a shout from the lookout.
4. concern, responsibility. If he catches you leaving early, that's your lookout!
by the look(s) of
judging from the appearance of (someone or something) it seems likely or probable. By the looks of him, he won't live much longer; It's going to rain by the look of it.
look after
to attend to or take care of. to look after the children.
look ahead
to consider what will happen in the future.
look down one's nose at
to regard with contempt.
look down on
to regard as inferior. She looks down on her husband's relations.
look for
to search for. She lost her handbag and wasted ten minutes looking for it.
look forward to
to wait with pleasure for. I am looking forward to seeing you / to the holidays.
look here!
give your attention to this. Look here! Isn't that what you wanted?; Look here, Mary, you're being unfair!
look in on
to visit briefly. I decided to look in on Paul and Carol on my way home.
look into
to inspect or investigate closely. The manager will look into your complaint.
look on
1. to watch something. No, I don't want to play – I'd rather look on.
2. (with as) to think of or consider. I have lived with my aunt since I was a baby, and I look on her as my mother.
look out
1. (usually with for) to watch. She was looking out for him from the window.
2. to find by searching. I've looked out these books for you.
look out!
beware! take care!.
look over
to examine. We have been looking over the new house.
look through
to look at or study briefly. I've looked through your notes.
look up
1. to improve. Things have been looking up lately.
2. to pay a visit to. I looked up several old friends.
3. to search for in a book of reference. You should look the word up (in a dictionary).
4. to consult (a reference book). I looked up in the encyclopedia.
look up to
to respect the conduct, opinions etc of. He has always looked up to his father.
References in classic literature ?
As regards its interior life, a large, dim looking-glass used to hang in one of the rooms, and was fabled to contain within its depths all the shapes that had ever been reflected there,--the old Colonel himself, and his many descendants, some in the garb of antique babyhood, and others in the bloom of feminine beauty or manly prime, or saddened with the wrinkles of frosty age.
Glancing at the looking-glass, we behold -- deep within its haunted verge -- the smouldering glow of the half-extinguished anthracite, the white moon-beams on the floor, and a repetition of all the gleam and shadow of the picture, with one remove further from the actual, and nearer to the imaginative.
The gallant Ichabod now spent at least an extra half hour at his toilet, brushing and furbishing up his best, and indeed only suit of rusty black, and arranging his locks by a bit of broken looking-glass that hung up in the schoolhouse.
Alfred Smirk considered himself very handsome; he spent a great deal of time about his hair, whiskers and necktie, before a little looking-glass in the harness-room.
Certain stray locks of decidedly curly hair, too, had escaped here and there, and had to be coaxed and cajoled into their place again; and then the new comer, who might have been five-and-twenty, turned from the small looking-glass, before which she had been making these arrangements, and looked well pleased,--as most people who looked at her might have been,--for she was decidedly a wholesome, whole-hearted, chirruping little woman, as ever gladdened man's heart withal.
There was no soap, no matches, no looking-glass -- ex- cept a metal one, about as powerful as a pail of water.
German books are easy enough to read when you hold them before the looking-glass or stand on your head--so as to reverse the construction--but I think that to learn to read and understand a German newspaper is a thing which must always remain an impossibility to a foreigner.
She glanced in the parlor looking-glass downstairs and was electrified at the vision.
My seat, to which Bessie and the bitter Miss Abbot had left me riveted, was a low ottoman near the marble chimney-piece; the bed rose before me; to my right hand there was the high, dark wardrobe, with subdued, broken reflections varying the gloss of its panels; to my left were the muffled windows; a great looking-glass between them repeated the vacant majesty of the bed and room.
There sat Magdalen, in an arm-chair before the long looking-glass, with all her hair let down over her shoulders; absorbed in the study of her part and comfortably arrayed in her morning wrapper, until it was time to dress for dinner.