iamb

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Related to Loose iambic: Iambic pentameter, Iambic meter

i·amb

 (ī′ămb′, ī′ăm′) also i·am·bus (ī-ăm′bəs)
n. pl. i·ambs also i·am·bus·es or i·am·bi (-bī′)
1. A metrical foot consisting of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable, as in delay.
2. A metrical foot in quantitative verse composed of a short syllable followed by a long one.

[French iambe, from Latin iambus, from Greek iambos.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

iamb

(ˈaɪæm; ˈaɪæmb) or

iambus

n, pl iambs, iambi (aɪˈæmbaɪ) or iambuses
1. (Poetry) a metrical foot consisting of two syllables, a short one followed by a long one (˘¯)
2. (Poetry) a line of verse of such feet
[C19 iamb, from C16 iambus, from Latin, from Greek iambos]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

i•amb

(ˈaɪ æm, ˈaɪ æmb)

n.
a prosodic foot of two syllables, a short followed by a long in quantitative meter, or an unstressed followed by a stressed in accentual meter, as in Come live / with me / and be / my love.
[1835–45; short for iambus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

iamb

a foot of two syllables, the first short or unstressed, the second long or stressed. — iambic, adj.
See also: Verse
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Iamb

 of poets—Lipton, 1970.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iamb - a metrical unit with unstressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
jamb
References in periodicals archive ?
These are composed in what we call "loose iambic meters" (Halle and Keyser 1999, using Robert Frost's term).
(In fact, "In the Waiting Room," which has the plainest style of any of Bishop's poems, scans as loose iambic trimeter.) One could look to many poems, early and late, for an array of musical effects, including the love poem "Insomnia," which Millay would have been hard-pressed not to appreciate:
English is no stranger to loose iambics, in which the poet freely substitutes and adds extra syllables.