Lord's Prayer


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Lord's Prayer

 (prâr)
n. Christianity
The prayer taught by Jesus to his disciples. Also called Our Father.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lord's Prayer

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the Lord's Prayer the prayer taught by Jesus Christ to his disciples, as in Matthew 6:9–13, Luke 11:2–4. Also known as: Our Father or Paternoster (esp Latin version)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lord's′ Prayer′

(prɛər)
n.
the, the prayer given by Jesus to His disciples, beginning with the words Our Father. Matt. 6:9–13; Luke 11:2–4.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lord's Prayer - the prayer that Christ gave his disciples in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:9-13)Lord's Prayer - the prayer that Christ gave his disciples in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:9-13)
Sermon on the Mount - the first major discourse delivered by Jesus (Matthew 5-7 and Luke 6:20-49)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Eliot, at the close of his Indian Grammar, mentions him as "a pregnant-witted young man, who had been a servant in an English house, who pretty well understood his own language, and had a clear pronunciation." He took this Indian into his family, and by constant intercourse with him soon become sufficiently conversant with the vocabulary and construction of the language to translate the ten commandments, the Lord's prayer, and several passages of Scripture, besides composing exhortations and prayers.
The very first of our Moralities seems to have been a play of the Lord's Prayer. It was acted in the reign of Edward III or some time after 1327.
The Lord's Prayer is on it and you'll devote your spare time this afternoon to learning it off by heart.
He was quite frightened, and he tried to repeat the Lord's Prayer; but all he could do, he was only able to remember the multiplication table.
Beside the same pal- let, kneeling in the early darkness of the short days, he recited aloud the Lord's Prayer before he slept.
One would think he would at least learn how to read the Lord's Prayer, by and by, but it is not so.
Guster holds certain loose atoms of an idea (picked up at Tooting, where they were found floating among the orphans) that there is buried money underneath the cellar, guarded by an old man with a white beard, who cannot get out for seven thousand years because he said the Lord's Prayer backwards.
Without boasting, you know, I may say that I know the Army Orders by heart and know the Regulations as well as I do the Lord's Prayer. So, Count, there never is any negligence in my company, and so my conscience was at ease.
A man will not be tempted to say the Lord's Prayer backward to please the devil, if he doesn't want the devil's services.
These completed, and the two alone again, it was pleasant to see (or would have been, if there had been any one to see it, which there never was), the old lady standing to say the Lord's Prayer aloud, and her son, Minor Canon nevertheless, standing with bent head to hear it, he being within five years of forty: much as he had stood to hear the same words from the same lips when he was within five months of four.
She duly went on with the Lord's Prayer, the children lisping it after her in a thin gnat-like wail, till, at the conclusion, raising their voices to clerk's pitch, they again piped into silence, "Amen!"
You may read the Lord's Prayer backwards, if you like - and, perhaps, have done it before to-day.