Lord Chancellor


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Lord Chancellor

n. pl. Lords Chancellor
The presiding officer of the House of Lords.

Lord Chancellor

n
(Law) government Brit the cabinet minister who is head of the judiciary in England and Wales and Speaker of the House of Lords

Lord` Chan′cellor



n., pl. Lord Chancellors.
the highest judicial officer of the British crown: ministry law adviser, presiding officer in the House of Lords, etc. Also called Lord′ High` Chan′cellor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lord Chancellor - the highest officer of the Crown who is head of the judiciary and who presides in the House of Lords
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
cabinet minister - a person who is a member of the cabinet
Translations

Lord Chancellor

n (Brit) → Lordsiegelbewahrer m, → Lordkanzler m
References in classic literature ?
Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln's Inn Hall.
Who happen to be in the Lord Chancellor's court this murky afternoon besides the Lord Chancellor, the counsel in the cause, two or three counsel who are never in any cause, and the well of solicitors before mentioned?
All this I saw from the open window of the Warden's breakfast-saloon, looking across the shoulder of the Lord Chancellor, who had sprung to his feet the moment the shouting began, almost as if he had been expecting it, and had rushed to the window which commanded the best view of the market-place.
He became Treasurer of the Exchequer, Speaker of the House of Commons, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, and last of all Lord Chancellor of England.
Jackson," said he, "go instantly to the Lord Chancellor, and tell him that I charge him with the execution of these orders.
'Would you care a ha'penny for the Lord Chancellor if you know'd him in private and without his wig?
At the Lord President's in Piccadilly, at Lambeth Palace, at the Lord Chancellor's in Great Ormond Street, in the Royal Exchange, the Bank, the Guildhall, the Inns of Court, the Courts of Law, and every chamber fronting the streets near Westminster Hall and the Houses of Parliament, parties of soldiers were posted before daylight.
Pocket was the only daughter of a certain quite accidental deceased Knight, who had invented for himself a conviction that his deceased father would have been made a Baronet but for somebody's determined opposition arising out of entirely personal motives - I forget whose, if I ever knew - the Sovereign's, the Prime Minister's, the Lord Chancellor's, the Archbishop of Canterbury's, anybody's - and had tacked himself on to the nobles of the earth in right of this quite supposititious fact.
The House of Commons, balked in an attack on the King and the Duke of Buckingham, suddenly turned on Bacon and impeached him for having received bribes in connection with his legal decisions as Lord Chancellor. Bacon admitted the taking of presents
'The late Lord Chancellor, gentlemen, was very fond of me,' said Mr.
Suffice it to say, that I believe the applications for loans, gifts, and offices of profit that I have been requested to forward to the originals of the BROTHERS CHEERYBLE (with whom I never interchanged any communication in my life) would have exhausted the combined patronage of all the Lord Chancellors since the accession of the House of Brunswick, and would have broken the Rest of the Bank of England.
There were engraved portraits of Lord Chancellors and other celebrated lawyers of the last century; and there were old pier-glasses to reflect them, as well as the little satin-wood tables and the sofas resembling a prolongation of uneasy chairs, all standing in relief against the dark wainscot This was the physiognomy of the drawing-room into which Lydgate was shown; and there were three ladies to receive him, who were also old-fashioned, and of a faded but genuine respectability: Mrs.