Lorenzo de'Medici


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Noun1.Lorenzo de'Medici - Italian statesman and scholar who supported many artists and humanists including Michelangelo and Leonardo and Botticelli (1449-1492)Lorenzo de'Medici - Italian statesman and scholar who supported many artists and humanists including Michelangelo and Leonardo and Botticelli (1449-1492)
References in periodicals archive ?
Two of the stars are the terracotta Portrait Bust of Lorenzo de'Medici, which is guardedly associated with the workshop of Antonio Benintendi (1475-1521) and the elegant limewood figure of Saint Catherine from the workshop of Niklaus Weckmann the Elder (active 1481-1526) in Ulm.
of Southern California) asks questions arising from the fact that this book was so highly valued that it was given as a diplomatic gift to the Constantinople court on behalf of Lorenzo de'Medici's Florentine government--chosen above other possibilities such as valuable silk, rare animals, or esteemed works of art.
Yet the result is not comparable to the uncanny likeness of Lorenzo de'Medici's mechanically produced death mask, for the latter is primarily a relic due to its indexical relation to the deceased.
Whatever one's personal scholarly interests, the documentation for Lorenzo's collection, the cataloguing of all the extant pieces owned or thought to have been owned by him, the market for antiquities, and the dealings and double-dealings of agents, Lorenzo de'Medici: Collector and Antiquarian will serve for generations to come: it includes a great deal of information on two of the most important, indeed legendary, dealers of the period, Giovanni Ciampolini and Domenico di Piero.
Lorenzo de'Medici (known understandably as The Magnificent) once commissioned a fabulous series of Books of Hours for his daughters' weddings.
Louis XI insisted on becoming the godfather of Lorenzo de'Medici's daughter, Lucrezia, in 1470.
it seems likely that it was the promise of Bentivoglio patronage which tempted Sperandio to Bologna and certainly Giovanni went to considerable trouble to help the sculptor rescue some of his belongings left behind in Faenza, writing twice in 1478 to Lorenzo de'Medici asking him to intercede.
That Brutus had already come to be presented as a noble tyrannicide and hero of republican liberty caused Cristoforo Landino to sidestep an over-literal reading of this passage in Inferno XXXIV, since he was committed both to the service of Lorenzo de'Medici, a virtual prince, and to the ancient Florentine ideal of civic freedom.