Lorraine


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Related to Lorraine: quiche Lorraine, Lorraine cross

Lor·raine

 (lō-rān′, lô-, lô-rĕn′)
A historical region and former province of northeast France. Originally part of the kingdom of Lotharingia, the region passed to France in 1766 but was ceded with Alsace to Germany after the Franco-Prussian War (1871). The area was returned to France by the Treaty of Versailles (1919).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lorraine

(lɒˈreɪn; French lɔrɛn)
n
1. (Placename) a region and former province of E France; ceded to Germany in 1871 after the Franco-Prussian war and regained by France in 1919; rich iron-ore deposits. German name: Lothringen
2. (Placename) Kingdom of Lorraine an early medieval kingdom on the Meuse, Moselle, and Rhine rivers: later a duchy
3. (Placename) a former duchy in E France, once the S half of this kingdom
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lor•raine

(ləˈreɪn, lɔ-, loʊ-)

n.
1. a medieval kingdom in W Europe along the Moselle, Meuse, and Rhine rivers.
2. a historic region in NE France, once included in this kingdom: a former province. Compare Alsace-Lorraine.
3. a metropolitan region in NE France. 2,313,200; 9092 sq. mi. (23,547 sq. km).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lorraine - an eastern French region rich in iron-ore depositsLorraine - an eastern French region rich in iron-ore deposits
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Lorraine

[lɒˈreɪn] NLorena f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Lorraine

[lɒˈreɪn] nLorena
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
His favorite, the Chevalier de Lorraine, leaning over the back of the prince's chair, was listening, with secret envy, to the Comte de Guiche, another of Philip's favorites, who was relating in choice terms the various vicissitudes of fortune of the royal adventurer Charles II.
"He has no soldiers," interrupted the Chevalier de Lorraine.
But Mazarin saw from the corner of his eye that a group was about to be formed in the corner of the room, and that the Duc d'Anjou, with the Comte de Guiche, and the Chevalier de Lorraine, prevented from talking aloud, might say, in a whisper, what it was not convenient should be said.
In the meantime Philip was discussing the questions of dress with the Chevalier de Lorraine, and they had ceased to hear the rustling of the cardinal's silk robe from behind the curtain.
le Chevalier de Lorraine ought not with impunity to constitute themselves the executioners of my honor and my happiness."
"The Chevalier de Lorraine," said the king; "that dismal fellow?"
"And now you say that I do wrong in having in your household the Chevalier de Lorraine, who gives Monsieur ill advice respecting you?"
"Remember well what I tell you, sire; the Chevalier de Lorraine some day - Observe, if ever I come to a dreadful end, I beforehand accuse the Chevalier de Lorraine; he has a spirit that is capable of any crime!"
"Germany will give up Alsace and Lorraine," he said hoarsely, "and will retire within her own frontiers.
An envoy of the Duke of Buckingham, named Montague, was taken, and proof was obtained of a league between the German Empire, Spain, England, and Lorraine. This league was directed against France.
At each corner were arranged trophies, presenting to view swords of all sorts, and on the walls hung four great pictures representing in their ordinary military costume the Cardinal de Lorraine, the Cardinal de Richelieu, the Cardinal de la Valette, and the Archbishop of Bordeaux.
There were five or six of these mansions on the quay, from the house of Lorraine, which shared with the Bernardins the grand enclosure adjoining the Tournelle, to the Hôtel de Nesle, whose principal tower ended Paris, and whose pointed roofs were in a position, during three months of the year, to encroach, with their black triangles, upon the scarlet disk of the setting sun.