loss ratio

(redirected from Loss Ratios)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

loss ratio

n.
The ratio between the premiums paid to an insurance company and the claims settled by the company.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

loss ratio

n
(Insurance) the ratio of the annual losses sustained to the premiums received by an insurance company
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

loss′ ra`tio


n.
the ratio of the losses paid by an insurer to premiums earned for a given period.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loss ratio - the ratio of the annual claims paid by an insurance company to the premiums received
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
THE EFFECTS OF CAPITAL RATIOS BEFORE FAILURE ON BIF LOSS RATIOS
National Union Fire's failure to maintain minimum loss ratios in compliance with Insurance Law resulted in certain New York volunteer firefighter companies being overcharged premiums in the aggregate amount of $1,571,704.
By the same token, loss ratios are low for services that comprise 65 percent or more of a firm's work.
* In Part 2, "(https://www.carriermanagement.com/features/2018/12/17/187715.htm) Getting to the Root of the Problem: Why One InsurTech's Loss Ratios Still Disappoint," the authors take an in-depth look at results for one of the three carriers.
THG accident year loss ratios excluding catastrophes, improved to 57.4% in 2017 from 60.6% in 2013.
Many states prescribe maximum loss ratios above which a premium rate increase must be granted by the state insurance department.
Third, most states made decisions and changes related to rate review, loss ratios, Medicaid expansion, and state-based exchanges in 2011 and 2012.
"Retention rates in the segment are high, though loss ratios have historically been weak, with excess capacity and poor pricing techniques major contributors."
Retention rates and loss ratios are generally low, with many insurers having limited technical expertise to underwrite the relatively higher risks covered in this segment.
From January 2014 through June 2014, monthly incurred loss ratios ranged from a low of 58 percent in May to a high of 140 percent in January.