ataxia

(redirected from Loss of coordination)
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a·tax·i·a

 (ə-tăk′sē-ə)
n.
1. Loss of the ability to coordinate muscular movement.
2. Any of various degenerative, often hereditary, disorders that are characterized by ataxia and are frequently associated with cerebellar atrophy.

[Greek ataxiā, disorder : a-, not; see a-1 + taxis, order.]

a·tax′ic adj. & n.

ataxia

(əˈtæksɪə) or

ataxy

n
(Pathology) pathol lack of muscular coordination
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: lack of coordination, from a-1 + -taxia, from tassein to put in order]
aˈtaxic, aˈtactic adj

a•tax•i•a

(əˈtæk si ə)

n.
loss of coordination of the muscles, esp. of the extremities.
[1605–15; < New Latin < Greek: indiscipline]
a•tax′ic, adj.

a·tax·i·a

(ə-tăk′sē-ə)
Loss of muscular coordination as a result of damage to the central nervous system.

ataxia, ataxy

inability to coordinate bodily movements, especially movements of the muscles. See also order and disorder.
See also: Disease and Illness
lack of order; irregularity. See also disease and illness.
See also: Order and Disorder

ataxia

Lack of coordination of the muscles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ataxia - inability to coordinate voluntary muscle movements; unsteady movements and staggering gait
nervous disorder, neurological disease, neurological disorder - a disorder of the nervous system
Friedreich's ataxia, herediatry spinal ataxia - sclerosis of the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord; characterized by muscular weakness and abnormal gait; occurs in children
hereditary cerebellar ataxia - nervous disorder of late childhood and early adulthood; characterized by ataxic gait and hesitating or explosive speech and nystagmus
spinocerebellar disorder - any of several congenital disorders marked by degeneration of the cerebellum and spinal cord resulting in spasticity and ataxia
Translations
ataxie
ataksia

ataxia

[əˈtæksɪə] Nataxia f

ataxia

nAtaxie f

ataxia

n ataxia
References in periodicals archive ?
Symptoms such as blurred vision, vivid dreams, insomnia, fatigue, dizziness, and loss of coordination are observed by the patients who discontinue the intake of the drugs.
Early signs of hypothermia include shivering and loss of coordination and judgment.
The disease - which behaves in a similar way to vCJD causing tremors, loss of coordination and neurodegeneration - spread because it was customary to eat the carcasses of loved ones.
A historical narrative for Michiko Ishimure, who won the 1973 Ramon Magsaysay Award for publicizing writings about the Minamata disease, shared this information: '[The strange malady] usually manifested itself first in numbness and a 'drunken' loss of coordination, which progressively led to a total loss of the ability to walk, speak, write, see, hear, smell and feel.
Carly Fox says to observe for signs of ataxia or loss of coordination, hypersensitivity to touch (and sound), and incontinence.
Census data shows that, "Health experts report that even a two-degree drop in body temperature results in reduced heart rate, loss of coordination and confusion.
It was an unwise and bad management decision to break up the DA and assign these four major agencies to another Cabinet member It resulted in loss of coordination in agricultural growth and development - and in determining the proper timing and amounts of needed rice importations.
Symptoms can include muscle weakness, decreased muscle size, foot-drop, foot bone abnormalities, fatigue, balance problems, neuropathic and/or musculoskeletal pain, loss of feeling in the hands and feet and loss of coordination in the limbs.
Four of these codes included possible motor dysfunction (abnormal gait, loss of coordination, fall), and the other 10 were identified as those associated with dementia/cognitive impairment.
They can lead to headaches, nausea, and loss of coordination in the longer term and are also known to cause damage to the liver and other parts of the body.