limpet

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limpet

any of various marine gastropod mollusks with a shallow conical shell and a broad muscular foot that sticks tightly to rocks: stuck like limpets to the spot, lest they forgot
Not to be confused with:
limpid – clear, transparent, as water or eyes: a limpid pool; lucid; easily comprehended: a limpid style of writing
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

lim·pet

 (lĭm′pĭt)
n.
1. Any of numerous marine gastropod mollusks that have a conical shell and often adhere to rocks in intertidal areas, especially those of the order Patellogastropoda.
2. One that clings persistently.
3. A type of explosive designed to cling to the hull of a ship and detonate on contact or signal.

[Probably Middle English lempet, limpet (sense uncertain); akin to Old English lamprede, lempedu, lamprey (both the limpet and the lamprey being noted for their powerful suckers), from Medieval Latin lamprēda; see lamprey.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

limpet

(ˈlɪmpɪt)
n
1. (Animals) any of numerous marine gastropods, such as Patella vulgata (common limpet) and Fissurella (or Diodora) apertura (keyhole limpet), that have a conical shell and are found clinging to rocks
2. (Animals) any of various similar freshwater gastropods, such as Ancylus fluviatilis (river limpet)
3. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (modifier) relating to or denoting certain weapons that are attached to their targets by magnetic or adhesive properties and resist removal: limpet mines.
4. (Nautical Terms) a small open caisson shaped to fit against a dock wall, used mainly in repair work
[Old English lempedu, from Latin lepas, from Greek]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lim•pet

(ˈlɪm pɪt)

n.
any of various marine gastropods with a low conical shell open beneath, usu. adhering to rocks.
[before 1050; Middle English lempet, Old English lempedu, alter. of *lepedu < Latin lepada, acc. of lepas < Greek lepás limpet]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.limpet - mollusk with a low conical shelllimpet - mollusk with a low conical shell  
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
2.limpet - any of various usually marine gastropods with low conical shells; found clinging to rocks in littoral areas
class Gasteropoda, class Gastropoda, Gasteropoda, Gastropoda - snails and slugs and their relatives
seasnail - any of several creeping marine gastropods with a spirally coiled shell: whelks; tritons; moon shells; neritids
Diodora apertura, Fissurella apertura, keyhole limpet - marine limpet having a conical shell with an opening at the apex
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kuželnatkapřílipka
albueskæl
tapadó tengeri csiga
sæsnigill af òarahettuætt
napslak
kužľovkamištička
deniz salyangozu

limpet

[ˈlɪmpɪt]
A. Nlapa f
like a limpetcomo una lapa
B. CPD limpet mine Nmina f lapa
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

limpet

[ˈlɪmpɪt] npatelle f
like a limpet (fig)comme une ventouse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

limpet

nNapfschnecke f; to stick to somebody like a limpet (inf)wie eine Klette an jdm hängen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

limpet

[ˈlɪmpɪt] n (Zool) → patella (fig) → persona appiccicosa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

limpet

(ˈlimpit) noun
a type of small, cone-shaped shellfish that fastens itself very firmly to rocks.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the first mollusc genomes to be sequenced were the California sea hare, Aplysia californica, and the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea.
Importantly for the proteomics mapping, the assembly appears to be relatively complete, with our BUSCO score similar to that of the gene set of other more "model" invertebrates, including Caenorhabditis elegans and Lottia gigantea (Simao et al., 2015: Waterhouse et al., 2018), although there was a higher proportion of duplicated orthologs (16.2% vs.
Our study organisms are a common intertidal prey item (the owl limpet Lottia gigantea) and its low tide (the black oystercatcher Haematopus bachmani) and high tide (the sea star Pisaster ochraceus) predators.
One system that has not been directly studied is the relationship between intertidal limpets of the species Lottia pelta (Rathke, 1833) found in the rocky intertidal zone and epizoic green algal growth, in particular growth of Acrosiphonia spp (J.
Effect of Exploitation on the Limpet Lottia gigantea: A Field Study in Baja California (Mexico) and California (U.S.A).
Los niveles altos de las zonas entre mareas consistian de Lottia mesoleuca, Nerita scabricosta y litorinidos.
While searching for genes similar to nodal in the right-handed snail, the marine limpet Lottia gigantea, the researchers found one that was analogous to the gene Pritx, which is activated by nodal and also involved in setting up left-right asymmetry in vertebrates.
En el caso de los invertebrados, se conoce la extincion de cuatro especies marinas: la lapa (Lottia alveus), desaparecida durante la decada de 1930 a causa de una enfermedad que afecto cierto tipo de pasto marino del que dependia por completo.
The first historical extinction of a marine invertebrate in an ocean basin: the demise of the eelgrass limpet Lottia alveus.
1987) and resulted in the extinction of the eelgrass limpet (Lottia alveus alveus) (Carlton 1993), a 75 to 90 percent decline in dark-bellied brent geese (Branta bernicla bernicla), and as much as a 90 percent decline in Atlantic brant (B.